Analysis of the excision repair of nondimer DNA damage induced by solar ultraviolet radiation in ICR 2A frog cells.

B. S. Rosenstein, C. C. Chao, Jonathan M Ducore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The excision repair of solar uv-induced nondimer DNA damage was examined in ICR 2A frog cells through the use of the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) photolysis assay. A relatively pure population of nondimer DNA photoproducts was induced by irradiation of ICR 2A cells with the Mylar-filtered solar ultraviolet (uv) wavelengths produced by a fluorescent sunlamp followed by exposure to photoreactivating light (PRL) which removes most of the small yield of pyrimidine dimers induced by this treatment. Cultures of cells were also exposed to 254 nm uv, which induces primarily dimers, and 60Co gamma rays. Through use of a modification of the BrdUrd photolysis assay possessing enhanced sensitivity, it was found that the solar uv-induced nondimer DNA damage was repaired by a short patch repair mechanism in which less than approximately 20 nucleotides are inserted into a repaired region. Similar results were also obtained for gamma-irradiated cells. In contrast, excision repair of 254-nm-induced dimers was accomplished by a long-patch process in which an average of about 180 nucleotides are inserted into the repaired sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-292
Number of pages7
JournalRadiation Research
Volume103
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

frogs
DNA Repair
ultraviolet radiation
Anura
DNA damage
DNA Damage
deoxyribonucleic acid
Photolysis
photolysis
dimers
nucleotides
Bromodeoxyuridine
Radiation
damage
Nucleotides
cells
Pyrimidine Dimers
Mylar (trademark)
pyrimidines
Gamma Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

Analysis of the excision repair of nondimer DNA damage induced by solar ultraviolet radiation in ICR 2A frog cells. / Rosenstein, B. S.; Chao, C. C.; Ducore, Jonathan M.

In: Radiation Research, Vol. 103, No. 2, 08.1985, p. 286-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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