Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers

Catarina Ginja, Luís T. Gama, Óscar Cortes, Juan Vicente Delgado, Susana Dunner, David García, Vincenzo Landi, Inmaculada Martín-Burriel, Amparo Martínez-Martínez, Cecilia Penedo, Clementina Rodellar, Pilar Zaragoza, Javier Cañon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Determining the value of livestock breeds is essential to define conservation priorities, manage genetic diversity and allocate funds. Within- and between-breed genetic diversity need to be assessed to preserve the highest intra-specific variability. Information on genetic diversity and risk status is still lacking for many Creole cattle breeds from the Americas, despite their distinct evolutionary trajectories and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. Methods. A comprehensive genetic analysis of 67 Iberoamerican cattle breeds was carried out with 19 FAO-recommended microsatellites to assess conservation priorities. Contributions to global diversity were investigated using alternative methods, with different weights given to the within- and between-breed components of genetic diversity. Information on Iberoamerican plus 15 worldwide cattle breeds was used to investigate the contribution of geographical breed groups to global genetic diversity. Results: Overall, Creole cattle breeds showed a high level of genetic diversity with the highest level found in breeds admixed with zebu cattle, which were clearly differentiated from all other breeds. Within-breed kinships revealed seven highly inbred Creole breeds for which measures are needed to avoid further genetic erosion. However, if contribution to heterozygosity was the only criterion considered, some of these breeds had the lowest priority for conservation decisions. The Weitzman approach prioritized highly differentiated breeds, such as Guabalá, Romosinuano, Cr. Patagonico, Siboney and Caracú, while kinship-based methods prioritized mainly zebu-related breeds. With the combined approaches, breed ranking depended on the weights given to the within- and between-breed components of diversity. Overall, the Creole groups of breeds were generally assigned a higher priority for conservation than the European groups of breeds. Conclusions: Conservation priorities differed significantly according to the weight given to within- and between-breed genetic diversity. Thus, when establishing conservation programs, it is necessary to also take into account other features. Creole cattle and local isolated breeds retain a high level of genetic diversity. The development of sustainable breeding and crossbreeding programs for Creole breeds, and the added value resulting from their products should be taken into consideration to ensure their long-term survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number35
JournalGenetics Selection Evolution
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2013

Fingerprint

Microsatellite Repeats
cattle
microsatellite repeats
breeds
kinship
genetic variation
cattle breeds
Weights and Measures
Genetic Hybridization
genetic diversity
analysis
marker
Conservation of Natural Resources
Food and Agricultural Organization
genetic analysis
Livestock
Financial Management
Fluorouracil
heterozygosity
zebu

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Ginja, C., Gama, L. T., Cortes, Ó., Delgado, J. V., Dunner, S., García, D., ... Cañon, J. (2013). Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers. Genetics Selection Evolution, 45(1), [35]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1297-9686-45-35

Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers. / Ginja, Catarina; Gama, Luís T.; Cortes, Óscar; Delgado, Juan Vicente; Dunner, Susana; García, David; Landi, Vincenzo; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Martínez-Martínez, Amparo; Penedo, Cecilia; Rodellar, Clementina; Zaragoza, Pilar; Cañon, Javier.

In: Genetics Selection Evolution, Vol. 45, No. 1, 35, 02.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ginja, C, Gama, LT, Cortes, Ó, Delgado, JV, Dunner, S, García, D, Landi, V, Martín-Burriel, I, Martínez-Martínez, A, Penedo, C, Rodellar, C, Zaragoza, P & Cañon, J 2013, 'Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers', Genetics Selection Evolution, vol. 45, no. 1, 35. https://doi.org/10.1186/1297-9686-45-35
Ginja, Catarina ; Gama, Luís T. ; Cortes, Óscar ; Delgado, Juan Vicente ; Dunner, Susana ; García, David ; Landi, Vincenzo ; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada ; Martínez-Martínez, Amparo ; Penedo, Cecilia ; Rodellar, Clementina ; Zaragoza, Pilar ; Cañon, Javier. / Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers. In: Genetics Selection Evolution. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Determining the value of livestock breeds is essential to define conservation priorities, manage genetic diversity and allocate funds. Within- and between-breed genetic diversity need to be assessed to preserve the highest intra-specific variability. Information on genetic diversity and risk status is still lacking for many Creole cattle breeds from the Americas, despite their distinct evolutionary trajectories and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. Methods. A comprehensive genetic analysis of 67 Iberoamerican cattle breeds was carried out with 19 FAO-recommended microsatellites to assess conservation priorities. Contributions to global diversity were investigated using alternative methods, with different weights given to the within- and between-breed components of genetic diversity. Information on Iberoamerican plus 15 worldwide cattle breeds was used to investigate the contribution of geographical breed groups to global genetic diversity. Results: Overall, Creole cattle breeds showed a high level of genetic diversity with the highest level found in breeds admixed with zebu cattle, which were clearly differentiated from all other breeds. Within-breed kinships revealed seven highly inbred Creole breeds for which measures are needed to avoid further genetic erosion. However, if contribution to heterozygosity was the only criterion considered, some of these breeds had the lowest priority for conservation decisions. The Weitzman approach prioritized highly differentiated breeds, such as Guabal{\'a}, Romosinuano, Cr. Patagonico, Siboney and Carac{\'u}, while kinship-based methods prioritized mainly zebu-related breeds. With the combined approaches, breed ranking depended on the weights given to the within- and between-breed components of diversity. Overall, the Creole groups of breeds were generally assigned a higher priority for conservation than the European groups of breeds. Conclusions: Conservation priorities differed significantly according to the weight given to within- and between-breed genetic diversity. Thus, when establishing conservation programs, it is necessary to also take into account other features. Creole cattle and local isolated breeds retain a high level of genetic diversity. The development of sustainable breeding and crossbreeding programs for Creole breeds, and the added value resulting from their products should be taken into consideration to ensure their long-term survival.",
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AU - García, David

AU - Landi, Vincenzo

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