Analogy of human immunodeficiency virus to hepatitis C virus

The human immunodeficiency model

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for many years overshadowed hepatitis C, which we now know is in some ways an even bigger problem. Important differences also exist between these two viruses and the diseases they cause, and we must be cautious about drawing too close an analogy. However, there are some striking similarities, and many lessons have been learned from HIV research over the past two decades. Parallels with HIV include persistence of the virus, genetic diversity during replication in the host, and the utility of combination treatment that is just now being appreciated with HCV infection. In the last few years, targeted antiviral drugs, such as protease inhibitors, have had an impressive effect on HIV-related morbidity and mortality. Similarities in the HIV and HCV genomes suggest that such drugs may also be useful in treating hepatitis. Copyright (C) 1999 Excerpta Medica Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-44
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume107
Issue number6 SUPPL. 2
StatePublished - Dec 27 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Hepacivirus
HIV
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis C
Protease Inhibitors
Hepatitis
Antiviral Agents
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Genome
Viruses
Morbidity
Mortality
Infection
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Analogy of human immunodeficiency virus to hepatitis C virus : The human immunodeficiency model. / Pollard, Richard B.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 107, No. 6 SUPPL. 2, 27.12.1999, p. 41-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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