An unfermented gel component of psyllium seed husk promotes laxation as a lubricant in humans

Jonas Tallkvist, Christopher Bowlus, Bo Lönnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In addition to increasing stool weight, supplements of psyllium seed husk produce stools that are slick and gelatinous. Objective: Our purpose was to test the hypothesis that a gel-forming fraction of psyllium escapes microbial fermentation and is responsible for the characteristics that enhance laxation. Design: Fifteen healthy adults consumed controlled diets for two 7-d periods, one of which included 8.8 g dietary fiber provided by 15 g/d of a psyllium seed husk preparation. All stools were collected and evaluated and diet was monitored throughout. Results: Psyllium significantly increased the apparent viscosity of an aqueous stool extract, stool moisture, and wet and dry stool weights. A very viscous fraction, not present in low-fiber stool and containing predominantly 2 sugars that are also found in abundance in psyllium husk, was isolated from psyllium stool. Conclusions: In contrast with other viscous fibers that are fermented completely in the colon, a component of psyllium is not fermented. This gel provided lubrication that facilitated propulsion of colon contents and produced a stool that was bulkier and more moist than were stools resulting with use of comparable amounts of other bowel-regulating fiber sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)784-789
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume72
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Psyllium
Lubricants
lubricants
hulls
Seeds
dietary fiber
Gels
gels
seeds
colon
diet
Colon
viscosity
Diet
Lubrication
Weights and Measures
fermentation
sugars
Dietary Fiber
Viscosity

Keywords

  • Colon function
  • Constipation
  • Dietary fiber
  • Fermentation
  • Laxation
  • Plantago ovata
  • Psyllium seed husk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

An unfermented gel component of psyllium seed husk promotes laxation as a lubricant in humans. / Tallkvist, Jonas; Bowlus, Christopher; Lönnerdal, Bo.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 72, No. 3, 2000, p. 784-789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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