An opiate cocktail that reduces morphine tolerance and dependence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Morphine is an exceptionally effective analgesic whose utility is compromised by the development of tolerance and dependence to the drug. Morphine analgesia and dependence are mediated by its activity at the mu opioid peptide (MOP) receptor [1]. The MOP receptor is activated not only by morphine, but also by other opiate drugs such as methadone and endogenous opioids such as endorphins. Morphine, however, is a unique opioid agonist ligand because it fails to induce endocytic trafficking of the MOP receptor [2], whereas the endogenous ligands and methadone do facilitate endocytosis [3]. Using the unique pharmacology of the MOP receptor and its proposed existence as an oligomeric structure [4], we designed a pharmacological cocktail that facilitates endocytosis of the MOP receptor in response to morphine. This cocktail consists of morphine and a small dose of methadone. Importantly, this cocktail, while retaining full analgesic potency, does not promote morphine dependence. We further demonstrate that dependence is reduced, at least in part, because endocytosis of the MOP receptor in response to morphine prevents the upregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1028-1033
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume15
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Opiate Alkaloids
Morphine Dependence
Peptide Receptors
Opioid Peptides
morphine
mu Opioid Receptor
opioid peptides
Morphine
Methadone
methadone
Endocytosis
endocytosis
Opioid Analgesics
Analgesics
narcotics
analgesics
Pharmacology
Ligands
Endorphins
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

An opiate cocktail that reduces morphine tolerance and dependence. / He, Li; Whistler, Jennifer.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 15, No. 11, 07.06.2005, p. 1028-1033.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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