An Observational Study of Abstracts Presented at the American College of Veterinary Surgeon Annual Meetings (2001–2008) and Their Subsequent Full-Text Publication

Katherine E. Meyers, Margaret J. Lindem, Michelle Giuffrida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the frequency of abstracts presented at American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) meetings from 2001 to 2008 that were published as complete articles, to identify abstract characteristics associated with final full-text publication, and to examine consistency of information between abstracts and final full-text publications. Study Design: Observational bibliographic study. Methods: Abstracts were retrieved from published proceedings. Published articles were retrieved from bibliographic databases. Features of abstract and article authorship, design, and content were recorded. Regression analysis identified abstract features associated with article publication, and evaluated consistency between abstracts and final publications. Results: Seven hundred eighty-two of 1078 (73%) abstracts were published as complete articles. Median time to publication was 1 year; 90% were published within 3 years. Abstracts originating from academic institutions were published more often than abstracts from practice or industry sites (odds ratio 2.61, 95% confidence interval 1.68–4.05). Compared to their conference abstracts, 49% of articles contained major inconsistences including changes in study design, interventions, outcomes, sample size, and results. For each year elapsed between presentation and publication, the odds of major inconsistency increased 2.4 times (odds ratio 2.36, 95% confidence interval 1.57–3.55) for retrospective studies and 1.4 times (odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.17–1.56) for other study designs. Changes in study title and authorship were frequent, particularly in publications that contained major inconsistencies. Conclusion: ACVS abstracts were promptly and reliably published, but final full-text publications often differed substantially from the original abstracts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-678
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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observational studies
Observational Studies
veterinarians
Publications
odds ratio
Authorship
confidence interval
experimental design
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Bibliographic Databases
educational institutions
Surgeons
retrospective studies
Sample Size
Industry
regression analysis
Retrospective Studies
Regression Analysis
industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

An Observational Study of Abstracts Presented at the American College of Veterinary Surgeon Annual Meetings (2001–2008) and Their Subsequent Full-Text Publication. / Meyers, Katherine E.; Lindem, Margaret J.; Giuffrida, Michelle.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.07.2016, p. 672-678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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