An application of the health belief model to patient education and compliance: acute otitis media.

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study made use of concepts from the health belief model to test the influence of educational intervention on patient attitude and subsequent sick-role behavior. The hypothesis tested was as follows: Mothers of pediatric patients in an experimental group (N-29) receiving specially designed education about otitis media, would consequently acquire greater awareness of their children's susceptibility to the disease, the possibility of its serious effects, and the benefits of treatment than a comparable control group (N-30) not receiving the educational intervention. It was further hypothesized that patient compliance would be higher in the experimental group. Experimental group health beliefs changed in a significant, positive direction with respect to illness susceptibility and severity, the benefits of treatment, and patient modifying factors. Control group attitudes did not significantly change. Compliance rates for both groups were very high; 91.8% compliance was noted for experimental subjects and 85.6% for controls. This may reflect the additional time and attention given all those participating in the study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-350
Number of pages4
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume18
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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