An animal model to assess aversion to intra-oral capsaicin: Increased threshold in mice lacking substance P

Christopher T. Simons, Jean Marc Dessirier, Steven L. Jinks, Earl Carstens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the widespread consumption of products containing chemicals that irritate the oral mucosa, little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms nor is there a corresponding animal model of oral irritation. We have developed a rodent model to assess aversion to capsaicin in drinking water, using a paired preference paradigm. This method was used to test the hypothesis that the neuromodulator substance P (SP) plays a role in the detection of intra-oral capsaicin. 'Knockout' (KO) mice completely lacking SP and neurokinin A due to a disruption of the preprotachykinin A gene and a matched population of wild-type (WT) mice had free access to two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other capsaicin at various concentrations. Both KO and WT mice showed a concentration-dependent aversion to capsaicin. KO mice consumed significantly more capsaicin than WT at a single near threshold (1.65 μM) concentration, indicating that SP plays a limited role in the detection and rejection of oral irritants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-497
Number of pages7
JournalChemical Senses
Volume26
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

capsaicin
substance P
Capsaicin
Substance P
mouth
Animal Models
animal models
Knockout Mice
mice
digestive tract mucosa
Neurokinin A
Irritants
Mouth Mucosa
neurotransmitters
drinking
bottles
Drinking Water
Drinking
drinking water
Neurotransmitter Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Simons, C. T., Dessirier, J. M., Jinks, S. L., & Carstens, E. (2001). An animal model to assess aversion to intra-oral capsaicin: Increased threshold in mice lacking substance P. Chemical Senses, 26(5), 491-497.

An animal model to assess aversion to intra-oral capsaicin : Increased threshold in mice lacking substance P. / Simons, Christopher T.; Dessirier, Jean Marc; Jinks, Steven L.; Carstens, Earl.

In: Chemical Senses, Vol. 26, No. 5, 2001, p. 491-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simons, CT, Dessirier, JM, Jinks, SL & Carstens, E 2001, 'An animal model to assess aversion to intra-oral capsaicin: Increased threshold in mice lacking substance P', Chemical Senses, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 491-497.
Simons, Christopher T. ; Dessirier, Jean Marc ; Jinks, Steven L. ; Carstens, Earl. / An animal model to assess aversion to intra-oral capsaicin : Increased threshold in mice lacking substance P. In: Chemical Senses. 2001 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 491-497.
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