Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes)

K. A. Terio, T. O'Brien, N. Lamberski, T. R. Famula, L. Munson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A high prevalence of systemic amyloidosis was documented in the black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) based on a retrospective review of necropsy tissues (n = 38) submitted as part of ongoing disease surveillance. Some degree of amyloid deposition was present in 33 of 38 (87%) of the examined cats, and amyloidosis was the most common cause of death (26/38, 68%). Amyloid deposition was most severe in the renal medullary interstitium (30/33, 91%) and glomeruli (21/33, 63%). Other common sites included the splenic follicular germinal centers (26/31, 84%), gastric lamina propria (9/23, 39%), and intestinal lamina propria (3/23, 13%). Amyloid in all sites stained with Congo red, and in 13 of 15 (87%) cats, deposits had strong immunoreactivity for canine AA protein by immunohistochemistry. There was no association with concurrent chronic inflammatory conditions (P = .51), suggesting that amyloidosis was not secondary to inflammation. Adrenal cortical hyperplasia, a morphologic indicator of stress that can predispose to amyloid deposition, was similarly not associated (P = .09) with amyloidosis. However, adrenals were not available from the majority of cats without amyloidosis; therefore, further analysis of this risk factor is warranted. Heritability estimation suggested that amyloidosis might be familial in this species. Additionally, tissues from a single free-ranging black-footed cat had small amounts of amyloid deposition, suggesting that there could be a predilection for amyloidosis in this species. Research to identify the protein sequence of serum amyloid A (SAA) in the black-footed cat is needed to further investigate the possibility of an amyloidogenic SAA in this species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-400
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary Pathology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Felis
amyloidosis
Amyloidosis
amyloid
Cats
Amyloid
Serum Amyloid A Protein
laminae (animals)
cats
Mucous Membrane
Congo Red
Germinal Center
disease surveillance
Republic of the Congo
Felis nigripes
hyperplasia
Hyperplasia
immunohistochemistry
Canidae
Cause of Death

Keywords

  • AA amyloid
  • Amyloidosis
  • Black-footed cat
  • Felis nigripes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Terio, K. A., O'Brien, T., Lamberski, N., Famula, T. R., & Munson, L. (2008). Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes). Veterinary Pathology, 45(3), 393-400. https://doi.org/10.1354/vp.45-3-393

Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes). / Terio, K. A.; O'Brien, T.; Lamberski, N.; Famula, T. R.; Munson, L.

In: Veterinary Pathology, Vol. 45, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 393-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terio, KA, O'Brien, T, Lamberski, N, Famula, TR & Munson, L 2008, 'Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes)', Veterinary Pathology, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 393-400. https://doi.org/10.1354/vp.45-3-393
Terio KA, O'Brien T, Lamberski N, Famula TR, Munson L. Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes). Veterinary Pathology. 2008 May;45(3):393-400. https://doi.org/10.1354/vp.45-3-393
Terio, K. A. ; O'Brien, T. ; Lamberski, N. ; Famula, T. R. ; Munson, L. / Amyloidosis in black-footed cats (Felis nigvipes). In: Veterinary Pathology. 2008 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 393-400.
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