Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners

Sarah S. Comstock, Rich DeMera, Laura C. Vega, Eric J. Boren, Sean Deane, Lori A D Haapanen, Suzanne S Teuber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Minimal data exist on the prevalence and characteristics of in-flight reactions to foods. Objectives: To characterize reactions to foods experienced by passengers aboard commercial airplanes and to examine information about flying with a food allergy available from airlines. Methods: Telephone questionnaires were administered to individuals in a peanut, tree nut, and seed allergy database who self-reported reactions aboard aircraft. Airlines were contacted to obtain information on food allergy policies. Results: Forty-one of 471 individuals reported allergic reactions to food while on airplanes, including 4 reporting more than 1 reaction. Peanuts accounted for most of the reactions. Twenty-one individuals (51%) treated their reactions during flight. Only 12 individuals (29%) reported the reaction to a flight attendant. Six individuals went to an emergency department after landing, including 1 after a flight diversion. Airline personnel were notified of only 3 of these severe reactions. Comparison of information given to 3 different investigators by airline customer service representatives showed that inconsistencies regarding important information occurred, such as whether the airline regularly serves peanuts. Conclusions: In this group of mainly adults with severe nut/seed allergy, approximately 9% reported experiencing an allergic reaction to food while on board an airplane. Some reactions were serious and potentially life-threatening. Individuals commonly did not inform airline personnel about their experiences. In addition, the quality of information about flying with food allergies available from customer service departments is highly variable and, in some cases, incomplete or inaccurate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-56
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume101
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Nuts
Aircraft
Food Hypersensitivity
Nut Hypersensitivity
Seeds
Hypersensitivity
Food
Escape Reaction
Nutrition Policy
Telephone
Hospital Emergency Service
Research Personnel
Databases
Arachis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Comstock, S. S., DeMera, R., Vega, L. C., Boren, E. J., Deane, S., Haapanen, L. A. D., & Teuber, S. S. (2008). Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 101(1), 51-56.

Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners. / Comstock, Sarah S.; DeMera, Rich; Vega, Laura C.; Boren, Eric J.; Deane, Sean; Haapanen, Lori A D; Teuber, Suzanne S.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 101, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 51-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Comstock, SS, DeMera, R, Vega, LC, Boren, EJ, Deane, S, Haapanen, LAD & Teuber, SS 2008, 'Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 101, no. 1, pp. 51-56.
Comstock SS, DeMera R, Vega LC, Boren EJ, Deane S, Haapanen LAD et al. Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2008 Jul;101(1):51-56.
Comstock, Sarah S. ; DeMera, Rich ; Vega, Laura C. ; Boren, Eric J. ; Deane, Sean ; Haapanen, Lori A D ; Teuber, Suzanne S. / Allergic reactions to peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds aboard commercial airliners. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 51-56.
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