All dressed up and know where to go: An example of how to use net benefit regression to do a cost-effectiveness analysis with person-level data (The 'A' in CEA)

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to show how to use person-level cost and outcome data to do a cost-effectiveness analysis using net benefit regression. With a small data set (from a hypothetical clinical trial of a new pharmacologic treatment for schizophrenia), we show how to use simple regression techniques to do a cost-effectiveness analysis. The method for the economic analysis that we illustrate is called net benefit regression. The first step is to create a net benefit variable (using each patient's cost and outcome data). The second step is to do regression. This simple process for the analysis of cost-effectiveness data using regression tools allows additional insight and the potential to implement more advanced techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Neuropsychiatry
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Schizophrenia
Economics
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Datasets

Keywords

  • Phamacologic treatment
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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