All-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality rates in postmenopausal white, black, hispanic, and asianwomenwith andwithout diabetes in the United States

The Women's Health Initiative, 1993-2009

Yunsheng Ma, James R. Hébert, Raji Balasubramanian, Nicole M. Wedick, Barbara V. Howard, Milagros C. Rosal, Simin Liu, Chloe E. Bird, Barbara C. Olendzki, Judith K. Ockene, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Lawrence S. Phillips, Michael J. LaMonte, Kristin L. Schneider, Lorena Garcia, Ira S. Ockene, Philip A. Merriam, Deidre M. Sepavich, Rachel H. Mackey, Karen C. Johnson & 1 others Joann E. Manson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from theWomen's Health Initiative (1993-2009; n = 158,833 participants, of whom 84.1% were white, 9.2% were black, 4.1% were Hispanic, and 2.6% were Asian), we compared all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality rates in white, black, Hispanic, and Asian postmenopausal women with and without diabetes. Cox proportional hazard models were used for the comparison from which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. Within each racial/ethnic subgroup, women with diabetes had an approximately 2-3 times higher risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality than did those without diabetes. However, the hazard ratios for mortality outcomes were not significantly different between racial/ethnic subgroups. Population attributable risk percentages (PARPs) take into account both the prevalence of diabetes and hazard ratios. For all-cause mortality, whites had the lowest PARP (11.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 10.1, 12.1), followed by Asians (12.9, 95% CI: 4.7, 20.9), blacks (19.4, 95% CI: 15.0, 23.7), and Hispanics (23.2, 95% CI: 14.8, 31.2). To our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that hazard ratios for mortality outcomes were not significantly different between racial/ethnic subgroups when stratified by diabetes status. Because of the "amplifying" effect of diabetes prevalence, efforts to reduce racial/ethnic disparities in the rate of death from diabetes should focus on prevention of diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1533-1541
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume178
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2013

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Women's Health
Hispanic Americans
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Population
hydroquinone
Health

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Health disparities
  • Menopause
  • Mortality
  • Obesity
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

All-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality rates in postmenopausal white, black, hispanic, and asianwomenwith andwithout diabetes in the United States : The Women's Health Initiative, 1993-2009. / Ma, Yunsheng; Hébert, James R.; Balasubramanian, Raji; Wedick, Nicole M.; Howard, Barbara V.; Rosal, Milagros C.; Liu, Simin; Bird, Chloe E.; Olendzki, Barbara C.; Ockene, Judith K.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Phillips, Lawrence S.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Schneider, Kristin L.; Garcia, Lorena; Ockene, Ira S.; Merriam, Philip A.; Sepavich, Deidre M.; Mackey, Rachel H.; Johnson, Karen C.; Manson, Joann E.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 178, No. 10, 15.11.2013, p. 1533-1541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, Y, Hébert, JR, Balasubramanian, R, Wedick, NM, Howard, BV, Rosal, MC, Liu, S, Bird, CE, Olendzki, BC, Ockene, JK, Wactawski-Wende, J, Phillips, LS, LaMonte, MJ, Schneider, KL, Garcia, L, Ockene, IS, Merriam, PA, Sepavich, DM, Mackey, RH, Johnson, KC & Manson, JE 2013, 'All-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality rates in postmenopausal white, black, hispanic, and asianwomenwith andwithout diabetes in the United States: The Women's Health Initiative, 1993-2009', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 178, no. 10, pp. 1533-1541. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwt177
Ma, Yunsheng ; Hébert, James R. ; Balasubramanian, Raji ; Wedick, Nicole M. ; Howard, Barbara V. ; Rosal, Milagros C. ; Liu, Simin ; Bird, Chloe E. ; Olendzki, Barbara C. ; Ockene, Judith K. ; Wactawski-Wende, Jean ; Phillips, Lawrence S. ; LaMonte, Michael J. ; Schneider, Kristin L. ; Garcia, Lorena ; Ockene, Ira S. ; Merriam, Philip A. ; Sepavich, Deidre M. ; Mackey, Rachel H. ; Johnson, Karen C. ; Manson, Joann E. / All-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality rates in postmenopausal white, black, hispanic, and asianwomenwith andwithout diabetes in the United States : The Women's Health Initiative, 1993-2009. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2013 ; Vol. 178, No. 10. pp. 1533-1541.
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