Alcohol and marijuana use in pathways of risk for sexually transmitted infection in white and black adolescent females

Tammy Chung, Feifei Ye, Alison E. Hipwell, Stephanie D. Stepp, Elizabeth Miller, Sonya Borrero, Mary Hawk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Some types of sexually transmitted infection (STI) have higher prevalence in females than males, and among black, relative to white, females. Identifying mechanisms of STI risk is critical to effective intervention. The authors tested a model in which alcohol and marijuana use serve as mediating factors in the associations between depression and conduct problems with sexual risk behavior (SRB) and STI in adolescent females. Methods: The Pittsburgh Girls Study is a longitudinal observational study of females who have been followed annually to track the course of mental and physical health conditions. The 3 oldest cohorts (N = 1750; 56.8% black, 43.2% white) provided self-reports of substance use, depression and conduct problems, SRB, and STI at ages 16–18. A path model tested alcohol and marijuana use at age 17 as mechanisms that mediate the associations of depression and conduct problems at age 16 with SRB and STI at age 18. Results: Race was involved in 2 risk pathways. In one pathway, white females reported greater alcohol use, which was associated with greater SRB. In another pathway, black females reported earlier sexual onset, which was associated with subsequent SRB. Public assistance use was independently associated with early sexual onset and STI. SRB, but not substance use, mediated the association of depression and conduct problems with STI. Conclusions: Differences by race in pathways of risk for SRB and STI, involving, for example, alcohol use and early sexual onset, were identified for young white and black females, respectively. Depression and conduct problems may signal risk for SRB and STI in young females, and warrant attention to improve health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-81
Number of pages5
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Alcohols
Depression
Public Assistance
hydroquinone
Self Report
Observational Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Health
Health

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • alcohol
  • female
  • marijuana
  • risky sexual behavior
  • sexually transmitted infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Alcohol and marijuana use in pathways of risk for sexually transmitted infection in white and black adolescent females. / Chung, Tammy; Ye, Feifei; Hipwell, Alison E.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Miller, Elizabeth; Borrero, Sonya; Hawk, Mary.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 38, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 77-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, Tammy ; Ye, Feifei ; Hipwell, Alison E. ; Stepp, Stephanie D. ; Miller, Elizabeth ; Borrero, Sonya ; Hawk, Mary. / Alcohol and marijuana use in pathways of risk for sexually transmitted infection in white and black adolescent females. In: Substance Abuse. 2017 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 77-81.
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abstract = "Background: Some types of sexually transmitted infection (STI) have higher prevalence in females than males, and among black, relative to white, females. Identifying mechanisms of STI risk is critical to effective intervention. The authors tested a model in which alcohol and marijuana use serve as mediating factors in the associations between depression and conduct problems with sexual risk behavior (SRB) and STI in adolescent females. Methods: The Pittsburgh Girls Study is a longitudinal observational study of females who have been followed annually to track the course of mental and physical health conditions. The 3 oldest cohorts (N = 1750; 56.8{\%} black, 43.2{\%} white) provided self-reports of substance use, depression and conduct problems, SRB, and STI at ages 16–18. A path model tested alcohol and marijuana use at age 17 as mechanisms that mediate the associations of depression and conduct problems at age 16 with SRB and STI at age 18. Results: Race was involved in 2 risk pathways. In one pathway, white females reported greater alcohol use, which was associated with greater SRB. In another pathway, black females reported earlier sexual onset, which was associated with subsequent SRB. Public assistance use was independently associated with early sexual onset and STI. SRB, but not substance use, mediated the association of depression and conduct problems with STI. Conclusions: Differences by race in pathways of risk for SRB and STI, involving, for example, alcohol use and early sexual onset, were identified for young white and black females, respectively. Depression and conduct problems may signal risk for SRB and STI in young females, and warrant attention to improve health outcomes.",
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