After the black box warning: Predictors of psychotropic treatment choices for older patients with dementia

Hyungjin Myra Kim, Claire Chiang, Helen C. Kales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate factors associated with the selection of pharmacological treatments often given as first-line treatments to elderly patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with dementia. It also evaluated patterns of medication usage over time in the year preceding and three years after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning for antipsychotic usage. Methods: A retrospective cohort consisted of 19,517 Veterans Affairs patients with diagnosed dementia and a new outpatient start with an antipsychotic agent (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, or risperidone) or valproic acid and its derivatives between May 1, 2004, and September 30, 2008. Patient and facility characteristics were examined for their association with the new starts of these medications. Results: Trends in the rate of fills for psychotropic medications varied, with yearly increases in the use of quetiapine, haloperidol, and valproic acid and decreasing use of olanzapine and risperidone. Predictors of haloperidol use included a new start in nonpsychiatric settings, prior benzodiazepine use, and any prior-year hospitalization. Anxiety disorder and major depression were predictive of not receiving haloperidol. Parkinson's disease was predictive of quetiapine use, whereas bipolar disorder was predictive of valproic acid use. Older age was predictive of use of antipsychotics rather than valproic acid. Urban facilities were less likely to use olanzapine, and significant regional variations were seen. Conclusions: Important patient and facility characteristics were associated with initiating different psychotropic agents among elderly dementia patients. In addition, the rate of use and the factors predictive of use varied across the study years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1214
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume62
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drug Labeling
olanzapine
Dementia
Valproic Acid
Haloperidol
Antipsychotic Agents
Risperidone
Therapeutics
Veterans
United States Food and Drug Administration
Anxiety Disorders
Benzodiazepines
Bipolar Disorder
Parkinson Disease
Hospitalization
Outpatients
Pharmacology
Depression
Quetiapine Fumarate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

After the black box warning : Predictors of psychotropic treatment choices for older patients with dementia. / Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Chiang, Claire; Kales, Helen C.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 62, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 1207-1214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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