African-American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider

Ivor B. Horn, Stephanie J. Mitchell, Jichuan Wang, Jill G Joseph, Lawrence S. Wissow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Patients' trust in their primary care providers has important implications in terms of health outcomes and, among minority patients, mitigating racial health disparities. This study aims to identify family, provider, and health care setting characteristics that predict African American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider and whether provider partnership-building communication style explains this association. Methods: Data were collected via retrospective telephone interviews completed 2 weeks after a child's health care visit to 1 of 7 pediatric primary care clinics in Washington, DC (3 community health centers, 3 private practices, and 1 hospital-based clinic). Four hundred twenty-five self-identified African American parents of children 0 to 5 years of age participated. Parents completed several standard survey instruments about trust and provider communication style as well as demographic questionnaires about their family and their child's provider. Results: A step-wise linear regression revealed significant independent effects of having a previous relationship with the provider and seeing a provider in a community health center (CHC) on higher trust. There was also evidence of mediation by provider communication style, suggesting that parents who take their child to a CHC report greater trust in their child's provider because they have higher perceptions of provider partnership building. Conclusions: African American parents' trust in their child's provider may be enhanced by continuity of care and greater use of a partnership-building communication style by providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-404
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Care
African Americans
Primary Health Care
Parents
Community Health Centers
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Health
Private Practice
Health
Linear Models
Demography
Interviews
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • African American
  • parent-provider communication
  • trust in provider

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

African-American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider. / Horn, Ivor B.; Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Wang, Jichuan; Joseph, Jill G; Wissow, Lawrence S.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 12, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 399-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horn, Ivor B. ; Mitchell, Stephanie J. ; Wang, Jichuan ; Joseph, Jill G ; Wissow, Lawrence S. / African-American parents' trust in their child's primary care provider. In: Academic Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 399-404.
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