Aerial adulticiding for the suppression of Culex tarsalis in Kern County, California, using low volume propoxur: 2. Impact on natural populations in foothill and valley habitats.

William Reisen, M. M. Milby, W. C. Reeves, M. W. Eberle, R. P. Meyer, C. H. Schaefer, R. B. Parman, H. L. Clement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A low volume formulation of propoxur wettable powder suspended in larvicidal oil was evaluated on 4 occasions in Kern Co., California during 1983 using fixed and rotary wing aerial application systems. Culex tarsalis abundance was suppressed significantly by all sprays, although reduction below the virus maintenance threshold of 30 females per trap night was achieved only at one foothill site. Western equine encephalomyelitis virus minimum infection rates decreased significantly after serial applications on 2 occasions at a valley site. However, virus persisted in the spray zone at minimum infection rates of greater than 1 per 1000 Cx. tarsalis females tested and transmission of virus to sentinel chickens continued. The parity rates were reduced significantly at 2 semi-isolated foothill sites, but not at a valley site where elevated autogeny rates increased the reproductive age of the host-seeking population. Spraying during late afternoon by helicopter resulted in better control than early morning applications by fixed wing aircraft at a valley site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-163
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume1
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Propoxur
propoxur
Culex tarsalis
Culex
Ecosystem
virus
valleys
Aircraft
Viruses
valley
Equine Encephalomyelitis
Western Equine Encephalitis Viruses
habitat
autogeny
habitats
Western equine encephalitis virus
wettable powders
spray
Population
aerial application

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Aerial adulticiding for the suppression of Culex tarsalis in Kern County, California, using low volume propoxur : 2. Impact on natural populations in foothill and valley habitats. / Reisen, William; Milby, M. M.; Reeves, W. C.; Eberle, M. W.; Meyer, R. P.; Schaefer, C. H.; Parman, R. B.; Clement, H. L.

In: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.06.1985, p. 154-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "A low volume formulation of propoxur wettable powder suspended in larvicidal oil was evaluated on 4 occasions in Kern Co., California during 1983 using fixed and rotary wing aerial application systems. Culex tarsalis abundance was suppressed significantly by all sprays, although reduction below the virus maintenance threshold of 30 females per trap night was achieved only at one foothill site. Western equine encephalomyelitis virus minimum infection rates decreased significantly after serial applications on 2 occasions at a valley site. However, virus persisted in the spray zone at minimum infection rates of greater than 1 per 1000 Cx. tarsalis females tested and transmission of virus to sentinel chickens continued. The parity rates were reduced significantly at 2 semi-isolated foothill sites, but not at a valley site where elevated autogeny rates increased the reproductive age of the host-seeking population. Spraying during late afternoon by helicopter resulted in better control than early morning applications by fixed wing aircraft at a valley site.",
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