Adverse impact of venous thromboembolism on patients with cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication of malignancy. This is related to the underlying cancer and thrombogenic effects of various therapies. Compared with VTE in patients without malignancies, cancer-associated thrombosis is associated with increased mortality, recurrence, and bleeding while on anticoagulants. These worse outcomes are due to a complex interplay between the underlying cancer, host response, antitumor therapies, and interactions between anticoagulants and cancer drugs. Primary prevention of VTE may decrease morbidity and possibly even improve cancer-related survival, but studies to date have not clearly identified a patient population that might be of most benefit nor consistently shown a survival benefit to anticoagulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-318
Number of pages6
JournalSeminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Venous Thromboembolism
Neoplasms
Anticoagulants
Survival
Primary Prevention
Thrombosis
Hemorrhage
Morbidity
Recurrence
Mortality
Therapeutics
Population

Keywords

  • anticoagulation
  • bleeding
  • cancer
  • chemotherapy
  • survival
  • venous thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Adverse impact of venous thromboembolism on patients with cancer. / Arora, Mili; Wun, Theodore.

In: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Vol. 40, No. 3, 2014, p. 313-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{38742d8218564fa4b50d36e480a4a87b,
title = "Adverse impact of venous thromboembolism on patients with cancer",
abstract = "Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication of malignancy. This is related to the underlying cancer and thrombogenic effects of various therapies. Compared with VTE in patients without malignancies, cancer-associated thrombosis is associated with increased mortality, recurrence, and bleeding while on anticoagulants. These worse outcomes are due to a complex interplay between the underlying cancer, host response, antitumor therapies, and interactions between anticoagulants and cancer drugs. Primary prevention of VTE may decrease morbidity and possibly even improve cancer-related survival, but studies to date have not clearly identified a patient population that might be of most benefit nor consistently shown a survival benefit to anticoagulation.",
keywords = "anticoagulation, bleeding, cancer, chemotherapy, survival, venous thromboembolism",
author = "Mili Arora and Theodore Wun",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1055/s-0034-1370769",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "313--318",
journal = "Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis",
issn = "0094-6176",
publisher = "Thieme Medical Publishers",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adverse impact of venous thromboembolism on patients with cancer

AU - Arora, Mili

AU - Wun, Theodore

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication of malignancy. This is related to the underlying cancer and thrombogenic effects of various therapies. Compared with VTE in patients without malignancies, cancer-associated thrombosis is associated with increased mortality, recurrence, and bleeding while on anticoagulants. These worse outcomes are due to a complex interplay between the underlying cancer, host response, antitumor therapies, and interactions between anticoagulants and cancer drugs. Primary prevention of VTE may decrease morbidity and possibly even improve cancer-related survival, but studies to date have not clearly identified a patient population that might be of most benefit nor consistently shown a survival benefit to anticoagulation.

AB - Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication of malignancy. This is related to the underlying cancer and thrombogenic effects of various therapies. Compared with VTE in patients without malignancies, cancer-associated thrombosis is associated with increased mortality, recurrence, and bleeding while on anticoagulants. These worse outcomes are due to a complex interplay between the underlying cancer, host response, antitumor therapies, and interactions between anticoagulants and cancer drugs. Primary prevention of VTE may decrease morbidity and possibly even improve cancer-related survival, but studies to date have not clearly identified a patient population that might be of most benefit nor consistently shown a survival benefit to anticoagulation.

KW - anticoagulation

KW - bleeding

KW - cancer

KW - chemotherapy

KW - survival

KW - venous thromboembolism

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84897399233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84897399233&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1055/s-0034-1370769

DO - 10.1055/s-0034-1370769

M3 - Article

C2 - 24599435

AN - SCOPUS:84897399233

VL - 40

SP - 313

EP - 318

JO - Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis

JF - Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis

SN - 0094-6176

IS - 3

ER -