Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia.

C. B. Stephensen, L. M. Franchi, H. Hernandez, M. Campos, R. H. Gilman, J. O. Alvarez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that high-dose vitamin A supplements will enhance recovery of children hospitalized for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. DESIGN: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of high-dose vitamin A supplements among children 3 months to 10 years of age (N = 95) admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia in Lima, Peru. Children </=1 year of age received 100 000 IU of water-miscible vitamin A on admission to the hospital and an additional 50 000 IU the next day. Children >1 year of age received 200 000 IU on admission and 100 000 IU the next day. RESULTS: Children receiving vitamin A (n = 48) had lower blood oxygen saturation (the mean difference on day 3 in hospital was 1.1%), higher prevalence rates of retractions (37% in the vitamin A group vs 15% in the placebo group on day 3), auscultatory evidence of consolidation (28% in the vitamin A group vs 17% in the placebo group on day 3), and were more likely to require supplemental oxygen (21% in the vitamin A group vs 8% in the placebo group on day 3) than children in the placebo group (n = 47). Adjustment for baseline severity of disease and nutritional status did not alter the association of vitamin A with increased clinical severity, although the difference in blood oxygen saturation was no longer statistically significant. No differences were seen in duration of hospitalization or in chest x-ray changes 14 days after admission. No deaths occurred, and toxicity of vitamin A was not seen. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that high-dose vitamin A supplements cause modest adverse effects in children recovering from pneumonia and should not be used therapeutically in such patients unless there is clinical evidence of vitamin A deficiency or concurrent measles infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume101
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospitalized Child
Vitamin A
Pneumonia
Placebos
Oxygen
Vitamin A Deficiency
Peru
Controlled Clinical Trials
Measles
Nutritional Status
Hospitalization
Thorax
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Stephensen, C. B., Franchi, L. M., Hernandez, H., Campos, M., Gilman, R. H., & Alvarez, J. O. (1998). Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia. Pediatrics, 101(5).

Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia. / Stephensen, C. B.; Franchi, L. M.; Hernandez, H.; Campos, M.; Gilman, R. H.; Alvarez, J. O.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 101, No. 5, 05.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stephensen, CB, Franchi, LM, Hernandez, H, Campos, M, Gilman, RH & Alvarez, JO 1998, 'Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia.', Pediatrics, vol. 101, no. 5.
Stephensen CB, Franchi LM, Hernandez H, Campos M, Gilman RH, Alvarez JO. Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia. Pediatrics. 1998 May;101(5).
Stephensen, C. B. ; Franchi, L. M. ; Hernandez, H. ; Campos, M. ; Gilman, R. H. ; Alvarez, J. O. / Adverse effects of high-dose vitamin A supplements in children hospitalized with pneumonia. In: Pediatrics. 1998 ; Vol. 101, No. 5.
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