Adverse childhood experiences and psychotic-like experiences are associated above and beyond shared correlates: Findings from the adolescent brain cognitive development study

Nicole R. Karcher, Tara A. Niendam, Deanna M. Barch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with increased risk for psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). However, ACEs and PLEs are also both associated with several shared factors (e.g., internalizing symptoms, suicidality). Few studies have explicitly examined whether the association between ACEs and PLEs remains over and above shared correlates. To address this question, using 10,800 9–11-year-olds, we examined whether ACEs and school-aged PLEs were associated when accounting for shared correlates, and whether there was evidence of mediation in associations between PLEs, ACEs, and these shared factors. Greater number of ACEs were associated with greater PLEs, including several specific ACEs (e.g., bullying). Importantly, ACEs and PLEs were related even when accounting for shared correlates. Further, PLEs partially mediated the relationships between ACEs and both internalizing symptoms and suicidality, including suicidal behavior. The current study helps clarify the nature of the associations between PLEs and ACE and has important clinical implications for addressing PLEs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSchizophrenia Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • Internalizing symptoms
  • Psychotic-like experiences
  • Suicidality
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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