Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals

Hong Yin, Laura Tully, Sarah Hope Lincoln, Christine I. Hooker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social anhedonia (SA) is a debilitating characteristic of schizophrenia, a common feature in individuals at psychosis-risk, and a vulnerability for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Prior work (Hooker et al., 2014) revealed neural deficits in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when processing positive social cues in a community sample of people with high SA. Lower VLPFC neural activity was related to more severe self-reported schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms as well as the exacerbation of symptoms after social stress. In the current study, psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis was applied to further investigate the neural mechanisms mediated by the VLPFC during emotion processing. PPI analysis revealed that, compared to low SA controls, participants with high SA exhibited reduced connectivity between the VLPFC and the motor cortex, the inferior parietal and the posterior temporal regions when viewing socially positive (relative to neutral) emotions. Across all participants, VLPFC connectivity correlated with behavioral and self-reported measures of attentional control, emotion management, and reward processing. Our results suggest that impairments to the VLPFC mediated neural circuitry underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits associated with social anhedonia, and may serve as neural targets for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number469
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue numberAUGUST
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2015

Fingerprint

Anhedonia
Prefrontal Cortex
Schizophrenia
Emotions
Motor Cortex
Temporal Lobe
Reward
Psychotic Disorders
Cues

Keywords

  • Cognitive control of emotion
  • Positive social emotion
  • Psychophysiological interaction
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social anhedonia
  • Ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals. / Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 9, No. AUGUST, 469, 26.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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