Adult Male Perpetrators’ Perspectives on What Prevention Approaches Work Best for Young Boys at Risk of Future Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration

Penelope K. Morrison, Elizabeth P. Miller, Jessica Burke, Patricia Cluss, Rhonda Fleming, Lynn Hawker, Donna George, Terry Bicehouse, Kalem Wright, Judy C. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As part of a 2-year ethnographic study, 49 adult men who had been convicted of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration were interviewed on what they thought would have prevented them from engaging in perpetration behaviors, or rather what they believed prevention with young boys needed to include in order to prevent future IPV perpetration. The authors’ open-ended interviews yielded five main themes: (a) messages about healthy relationship behaviors, (b) the need to promote respect for women, (c) teaching effective skills for communicating and managing anger, (d) programs that provide role models and are school-based, and (e) addressing the impact of experiencing violence as a child. The authors conclude that prevention efforts focused on changing both attitudes regarding IPV and behaviors might be most effective for reducing perpetration, and that greater attention needs to be paid towards prevention among youth most at risk of IPV perpetration, those experiencing violence in their homes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 21 2017

Fingerprint

Violence
Anger
Teaching
Interviews
Intimate Partner Violence

Keywords

  • Battering
  • domestic violence
  • exposure to violence
  • intervention
  • intimate partner violence
  • offender/perpetrator
  • prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Adult Male Perpetrators’ Perspectives on What Prevention Approaches Work Best for Young Boys at Risk of Future Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration. / Morrison, Penelope K.; Miller, Elizabeth P.; Burke, Jessica; Cluss, Patricia; Fleming, Rhonda; Hawker, Lynn; George, Donna; Bicehouse, Terry; Wright, Kalem; Chang, Judy C.

In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma, 21.06.2017, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, Penelope K. ; Miller, Elizabeth P. ; Burke, Jessica ; Cluss, Patricia ; Fleming, Rhonda ; Hawker, Lynn ; George, Donna ; Bicehouse, Terry ; Wright, Kalem ; Chang, Judy C. / Adult Male Perpetrators’ Perspectives on What Prevention Approaches Work Best for Young Boys at Risk of Future Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration. In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma. 2017 ; pp. 1-20.
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