Adoptive immunotherapy involving recombinant human M-CSF and R24 anti- melanoma antibody induces human T-cell infiltration into human melanoma xenografts

Kevin C. Conlon, Miriam R. Anver, Dan L. Longo, John R. Ortaldo, William J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Directed motion toward and infiltration of tumor masses by effector cells is essential for successful adoptive immunotherapy. A human/SCID mouse chimeric system was used to examine whether an antitumor antibody and recombinant human monocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhM-CSF) could promote human T-cell infiltration of a human tumor in vivo. Fourteen days after subcutaneous injection of the human melanoma cell line M-14 into SCID recipients, several adoptive immunotherapy regimens were initiated using activated human T cells, an anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (R24), and rhM-CSF. Effects on tumor growth and human T-cell infiltration into the tumor were assessed. Compared with other treatment groups, only mice treated with the combination of activated human T cells, anti-tumor MoAb, and rhM- CSF demonstrated a significant cellular infiltrate in the melanoma. Immunohistology demonstrated human T cells present in the tumor up to 7 days after injection. Groups treated with rhRANTES or rmGM-CSF in place of rhM- CSF exhibited markedly less human T-cell infiltration. Additionally, only mice treated with human T cells, R24, and rhM-CSF demonstrated a significant antitumor response in vivo. This model suggests that activated human T cells can be specifically targeted to in vivo tumor sites by combined treatment with an antitumor antibody and rhM-CSF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-323
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunotherapy
Volume19
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Adoptive Immunotherapy
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Heterografts
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Melanoma
T-Lymphocytes
Colony-Stimulating Factors
Monocytes
Neoplasms
Monoclonal Antibodies
Neoplasm Antibodies
SCID Mice
Antibodies
Subcutaneous Injections

Keywords

  • Human T cells
  • M-CSF
  • MoAbs
  • Trafficking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Adoptive immunotherapy involving recombinant human M-CSF and R24 anti- melanoma antibody induces human T-cell infiltration into human melanoma xenografts. / Conlon, Kevin C.; Anver, Miriam R.; Longo, Dan L.; Ortaldo, John R.; Murphy, William J.

In: Journal of Immunotherapy, Vol. 19, No. 5, 1996, p. 317-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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