Adolescent well-being in Washington State military families

Sarah C. Reed, Janice F Bell, Todd C. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We examined associations between parental military service and adolescent well-being. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from the 2008 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey collected in public school grades 8, 10, and 12 (n=10606). We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to test associations between parental military service and adolescent well-being (quality of life, depressed mood, thoughts of suicide). Results: In 8th grade, parental deployment was associated with higher odds of reporting thoughts of suicide among adolescent girls (odds ratio [OR]=1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.19, 2.32) and higher odds of low quality of life (OR=2.10; 95% CI=1.43, 3.10) and thoughts of suicide (OR=1.75; 95% CI=1.15, 2.67) among adolescent boys. In 10th and 12th grades, parental deployment was associated with higher odds of reporting low quality of life (OR=2.74; 95% CI=1.79, 4.20), depressed mood (OR=1.50; 95% CI=1.02, 2.20), and thoughts of suicide (OR=1.64; 95% CI=1.13, 2.38) among adolescent boys. Conclusions: Parental military deployment is associated with increased odds of impaired well-being among adolescents, especially adolescent boys. Military, school-based, and public health professionals have a unique opportunity to develop school- and community-based interventions to improve the well-being of adolescents in military families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1676-1682
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Child Welfare
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Suicide
Quality of Life
Public Health Schools
Military Family
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adolescent well-being in Washington State military families. / Reed, Sarah C.; Bell, Janice F; Edwards, Todd C.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 101, No. 9, 01.09.2011, p. 1676-1682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reed, Sarah C. ; Bell, Janice F ; Edwards, Todd C. / Adolescent well-being in Washington State military families. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 101, No. 9. pp. 1676-1682.
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