Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens

Elizabeth Miller, Heather L. McCauley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) involves a range of coercive and violent behaviours in romantic or consensual relationships. ARA is prevalent and is associated with multiple poor reproductive and sexual health outcomes, especially for adolescent girls. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies and reviews of ARA research point to the prevalence of ARA, health consequences of ARA and the contribution of social and cultural norms to ARA perpetration, all of which can inform how to address ARA more effectively with adolescents. Emerging research on reproductive and sexual coercion among adolescents and technology-based abuse is directly relevant to the reproductive and sexual healthcare of adolescents. SUMMARY: Current findings underscore the extent to which young, reproductive-aged women may particularly benefit from more effective methods to address ARA. In line with recent American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, clinicians should assess for and counsel their adolescent female patients about how ARA and reproductive and sexual coercion may influence adolescent girls' reproductive health. Recent evidence also highlights that ARA manifests in ways that may be less recognizable to clinicians, such as cyber dating abuse. Finally, ARA prevention and intervention efforts should continue to promote gender equity and address the social and cultural norms that shape adolescent girls' experiences of abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-369
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coercion
Sex Offenses
Reproductive Health

Keywords

  • adolescent relationship abuse
  • dating violence
  • partner abuse
  • partner violence
  • reproductive coercion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens. / Miller, Elizabeth; McCauley, Heather L.

In: Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 10.2013, p. 364-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Elizabeth ; McCauley, Heather L. / Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens. In: Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 364-369.
@article{5d225d4c41454bfda353fea71577dae1,
title = "Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens",
abstract = "PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) involves a range of coercive and violent behaviours in romantic or consensual relationships. ARA is prevalent and is associated with multiple poor reproductive and sexual health outcomes, especially for adolescent girls. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies and reviews of ARA research point to the prevalence of ARA, health consequences of ARA and the contribution of social and cultural norms to ARA perpetration, all of which can inform how to address ARA more effectively with adolescents. Emerging research on reproductive and sexual coercion among adolescents and technology-based abuse is directly relevant to the reproductive and sexual healthcare of adolescents. SUMMARY: Current findings underscore the extent to which young, reproductive-aged women may particularly benefit from more effective methods to address ARA. In line with recent American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, clinicians should assess for and counsel their adolescent female patients about how ARA and reproductive and sexual coercion may influence adolescent girls' reproductive health. Recent evidence also highlights that ARA manifests in ways that may be less recognizable to clinicians, such as cyber dating abuse. Finally, ARA prevention and intervention efforts should continue to promote gender equity and address the social and cultural norms that shape adolescent girls' experiences of abuse.",
keywords = "adolescent relationship abuse, dating violence, partner abuse, partner violence, reproductive coercion",
author = "Elizabeth Miller and McCauley, {Heather L.}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/GCO.0b013e328364ecab",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "364--369",
journal = "Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "1040-872X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens

AU - Miller, Elizabeth

AU - McCauley, Heather L.

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) involves a range of coercive and violent behaviours in romantic or consensual relationships. ARA is prevalent and is associated with multiple poor reproductive and sexual health outcomes, especially for adolescent girls. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies and reviews of ARA research point to the prevalence of ARA, health consequences of ARA and the contribution of social and cultural norms to ARA perpetration, all of which can inform how to address ARA more effectively with adolescents. Emerging research on reproductive and sexual coercion among adolescents and technology-based abuse is directly relevant to the reproductive and sexual healthcare of adolescents. SUMMARY: Current findings underscore the extent to which young, reproductive-aged women may particularly benefit from more effective methods to address ARA. In line with recent American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, clinicians should assess for and counsel their adolescent female patients about how ARA and reproductive and sexual coercion may influence adolescent girls' reproductive health. Recent evidence also highlights that ARA manifests in ways that may be less recognizable to clinicians, such as cyber dating abuse. Finally, ARA prevention and intervention efforts should continue to promote gender equity and address the social and cultural norms that shape adolescent girls' experiences of abuse.

AB - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) involves a range of coercive and violent behaviours in romantic or consensual relationships. ARA is prevalent and is associated with multiple poor reproductive and sexual health outcomes, especially for adolescent girls. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies and reviews of ARA research point to the prevalence of ARA, health consequences of ARA and the contribution of social and cultural norms to ARA perpetration, all of which can inform how to address ARA more effectively with adolescents. Emerging research on reproductive and sexual coercion among adolescents and technology-based abuse is directly relevant to the reproductive and sexual healthcare of adolescents. SUMMARY: Current findings underscore the extent to which young, reproductive-aged women may particularly benefit from more effective methods to address ARA. In line with recent American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, clinicians should assess for and counsel their adolescent female patients about how ARA and reproductive and sexual coercion may influence adolescent girls' reproductive health. Recent evidence also highlights that ARA manifests in ways that may be less recognizable to clinicians, such as cyber dating abuse. Finally, ARA prevention and intervention efforts should continue to promote gender equity and address the social and cultural norms that shape adolescent girls' experiences of abuse.

KW - adolescent relationship abuse

KW - dating violence

KW - partner abuse

KW - partner violence

KW - reproductive coercion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884867161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884867161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/GCO.0b013e328364ecab

DO - 10.1097/GCO.0b013e328364ecab

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 364

EP - 369

JO - Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 1040-872X

IS - 5

ER -