Adjuvant Chemotherapy Does Not Improve Survival for Lung Cancer With Chest Wall Invasion

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Abstract

Background: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) for patients with completely resected (R0) pT3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with chest wall invasion. There is minimal evidence to support this recommendation. We aimed to determine whether there is a survival benefit with AC and if so whether it depends on tumor size. Methods: Patients who had undergone R0 resection for pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 2008 to 2012. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine independent predictors of overall mortality. Results: Of 247 patients, 92 (37.3%) received AC. The median tumor size without AC was 42 mm (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 60 mm) and with AC was 56 mm (IQR, 40 to 70 mm; p = 0.003). Median follow-up was 21.7 months (IQR, 10.6 to 29.1 months). There was no difference in AC based on tumor grade, but the 3-year overall survival for those with well-differentiated or moderately differentiated tumors was 68% versus 55% in those with poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumors. Three-year overall survival for the entire cohort was 59%. There was no difference in overall survival between those who received AC and those who did not. The only significant predictor of mortality in both univariable and multivariable analyses was poorly or undifferentiated tumor grade. Conclusions: For patients with pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion there is no survival benefit with AC, regardless of tumor size or grade, after R0 resection. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumor grade is an independent predictor of mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Thoracic Wall
Adjuvant Chemotherapy
Lung Neoplasms
Survival
Neoplasms
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Mortality
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{debdb604a9174a8caeb5af6c3e927594,
title = "Adjuvant Chemotherapy Does Not Improve Survival for Lung Cancer With Chest Wall Invasion",
abstract = "Background: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) for patients with completely resected (R0) pT3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with chest wall invasion. There is minimal evidence to support this recommendation. We aimed to determine whether there is a survival benefit with AC and if so whether it depends on tumor size. Methods: Patients who had undergone R0 resection for pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 2008 to 2012. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine independent predictors of overall mortality. Results: Of 247 patients, 92 (37.3{\%}) received AC. The median tumor size without AC was 42 mm (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 60 mm) and with AC was 56 mm (IQR, 40 to 70 mm; p = 0.003). Median follow-up was 21.7 months (IQR, 10.6 to 29.1 months). There was no difference in AC based on tumor grade, but the 3-year overall survival for those with well-differentiated or moderately differentiated tumors was 68{\%} versus 55{\%} in those with poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumors. Three-year overall survival for the entire cohort was 59{\%}. There was no difference in overall survival between those who received AC and those who did not. The only significant predictor of mortality in both univariable and multivariable analyses was poorly or undifferentiated tumor grade. Conclusions: For patients with pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion there is no survival benefit with AC, regardless of tumor size or grade, after R0 resection. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumor grade is an independent predictor of mortality.",
author = "Brown, {Lisa M} and Cooke, {David T} and Elizabeth David",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.athoracsur.2017.06.070",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Annals of Thoracic Surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",

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T1 - Adjuvant Chemotherapy Does Not Improve Survival for Lung Cancer With Chest Wall Invasion

AU - Brown, Lisa M

AU - Cooke, David T

AU - David, Elizabeth

PY - 2017

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N2 - Background: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) for patients with completely resected (R0) pT3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with chest wall invasion. There is minimal evidence to support this recommendation. We aimed to determine whether there is a survival benefit with AC and if so whether it depends on tumor size. Methods: Patients who had undergone R0 resection for pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 2008 to 2012. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine independent predictors of overall mortality. Results: Of 247 patients, 92 (37.3%) received AC. The median tumor size without AC was 42 mm (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 60 mm) and with AC was 56 mm (IQR, 40 to 70 mm; p = 0.003). Median follow-up was 21.7 months (IQR, 10.6 to 29.1 months). There was no difference in AC based on tumor grade, but the 3-year overall survival for those with well-differentiated or moderately differentiated tumors was 68% versus 55% in those with poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumors. Three-year overall survival for the entire cohort was 59%. There was no difference in overall survival between those who received AC and those who did not. The only significant predictor of mortality in both univariable and multivariable analyses was poorly or undifferentiated tumor grade. Conclusions: For patients with pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion there is no survival benefit with AC, regardless of tumor size or grade, after R0 resection. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumor grade is an independent predictor of mortality.

AB - Background: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) for patients with completely resected (R0) pT3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with chest wall invasion. There is minimal evidence to support this recommendation. We aimed to determine whether there is a survival benefit with AC and if so whether it depends on tumor size. Methods: Patients who had undergone R0 resection for pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 2008 to 2012. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine independent predictors of overall mortality. Results: Of 247 patients, 92 (37.3%) received AC. The median tumor size without AC was 42 mm (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 60 mm) and with AC was 56 mm (IQR, 40 to 70 mm; p = 0.003). Median follow-up was 21.7 months (IQR, 10.6 to 29.1 months). There was no difference in AC based on tumor grade, but the 3-year overall survival for those with well-differentiated or moderately differentiated tumors was 68% versus 55% in those with poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumors. Three-year overall survival for the entire cohort was 59%. There was no difference in overall survival between those who received AC and those who did not. The only significant predictor of mortality in both univariable and multivariable analyses was poorly or undifferentiated tumor grade. Conclusions: For patients with pT3N0M0 NSCLC with chest wall invasion there is no survival benefit with AC, regardless of tumor size or grade, after R0 resection. Poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumor grade is an independent predictor of mortality.

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