Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural persons living with HIV disease in the United States

B. D. Heckman, Sheryl L Catz, T. G. Heckman, J. G. Miller, S. C. Kalichman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study delineated patterns and predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in 329 persons living with HIV disease in rural areas of 12 US states. Participants provided self-report data on patterns of HIV medication adherence, reasons for missing medication doses, psychological symptomatology, life-stressor burden, social support, ways of coping, coping self-efficacy, the quality of their relationship with their main physician, and barriers to health care and social services. Based on adherence data collected via retrospective, self-report assessment instruments, only 50% of participants adhered consistently to antiretroviral therapy regimens in the past week. Consistent adherence was more common in White participants, persons who had progressed to AIDS, and 'native infections' (i.e. persons who were born, raised, and infected in their current place of residence). Logistic regression analyses indicated that consistent adherence was reported by persons who drank less alcohol, had a good relationship with their main physician, and engaged in more active coping in response to HIV-related life stressors. As the number of rural persons living with HIV disease continues to increase, research that identifies correlates of non-adherence and conceptualizes approaches to optimize adherence in this group is urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-230
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

HIV
Disease
human being
coping
Self Report
medication
physician
Physicians
Therapeutics
Medication Adherence
place of residence
Self Efficacy
health care services
Social Work
Social Support
mobile social services
Health Services
self-efficacy
social support
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in rural persons living with HIV disease in the United States. / Heckman, B. D.; Catz, Sheryl L; Heckman, T. G.; Miller, J. G.; Kalichman, S. C.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 16, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 219-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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