Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

Dianna S. Howard, Gordon L. Phillips, Donna E. Reece, Rita K. Munn, Jean Henslee-Downey, Melissa Pittard, Matthew Barker, Claire Pomeroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

185 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a 12% incidence of adenovirus infections among 532 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from January 1986 through March 1997. The median time from day of stem cell infusion to first positive culture was 41 days. Recipients of allogeneic stem cells, as opposed to autologous stem cell recipients, were more likely to have a culture positive for adenovirus (16% vs. 3%; P < .0001). Pediatric patients were also more likely than adults to have a positive culture (23% vs. 9%; P < .0001). Among stem cell recipients with partially matched related donors, pediatric recipients appear to be at significantly greater risk for infection than adult recipients (P < .001). Positive cultures were associated with evidence of invasion in 64% of cases (41 of 64). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that isolating adenovirus from more than 1 site correlated with greater risk for invasive infections (P = .002). Invasive infections were associated with poorer chance of survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1494-1501
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adenoviridae Infections
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Stem Cells
Transplants
Adenoviridae
Infection
Pediatrics
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Tissue Donors
Survival
Transplant Recipients
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Howard, D. S., Phillips, G. L., Reece, D. E., Munn, R. K., Henslee-Downey, J., Pittard, M., ... Pomeroy, C. (1999). Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 29(6), 1494-1501. https://doi.org/10.1086/313514

Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. / Howard, Dianna S.; Phillips, Gordon L.; Reece, Donna E.; Munn, Rita K.; Henslee-Downey, Jean; Pittard, Melissa; Barker, Matthew; Pomeroy, Claire.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 29, No. 6, 1999, p. 1494-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howard, DS, Phillips, GL, Reece, DE, Munn, RK, Henslee-Downey, J, Pittard, M, Barker, M & Pomeroy, C 1999, 'Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 1494-1501. https://doi.org/10.1086/313514
Howard DS, Phillips GL, Reece DE, Munn RK, Henslee-Downey J, Pittard M et al. Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 1999;29(6):1494-1501. https://doi.org/10.1086/313514
Howard, Dianna S. ; Phillips, Gordon L. ; Reece, Donna E. ; Munn, Rita K. ; Henslee-Downey, Jean ; Pittard, Melissa ; Barker, Matthew ; Pomeroy, Claire. / Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 1494-1501.
@article{0de296e340ad4684983de3fa80119803,
title = "Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients",
abstract = "We report a 12{\%} incidence of adenovirus infections among 532 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from January 1986 through March 1997. The median time from day of stem cell infusion to first positive culture was 41 days. Recipients of allogeneic stem cells, as opposed to autologous stem cell recipients, were more likely to have a culture positive for adenovirus (16{\%} vs. 3{\%}; P < .0001). Pediatric patients were also more likely than adults to have a positive culture (23{\%} vs. 9{\%}; P < .0001). Among stem cell recipients with partially matched related donors, pediatric recipients appear to be at significantly greater risk for infection than adult recipients (P < .001). Positive cultures were associated with evidence of invasion in 64{\%} of cases (41 of 64). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that isolating adenovirus from more than 1 site correlated with greater risk for invasive infections (P = .002). Invasive infections were associated with poorer chance of survival.",
author = "Howard, {Dianna S.} and Phillips, {Gordon L.} and Reece, {Donna E.} and Munn, {Rita K.} and Jean Henslee-Downey and Melissa Pittard and Matthew Barker and Claire Pomeroy",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.1086/313514",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "1494--1501",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

AU - Howard, Dianna S.

AU - Phillips, Gordon L.

AU - Reece, Donna E.

AU - Munn, Rita K.

AU - Henslee-Downey, Jean

AU - Pittard, Melissa

AU - Barker, Matthew

AU - Pomeroy, Claire

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - We report a 12% incidence of adenovirus infections among 532 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from January 1986 through March 1997. The median time from day of stem cell infusion to first positive culture was 41 days. Recipients of allogeneic stem cells, as opposed to autologous stem cell recipients, were more likely to have a culture positive for adenovirus (16% vs. 3%; P < .0001). Pediatric patients were also more likely than adults to have a positive culture (23% vs. 9%; P < .0001). Among stem cell recipients with partially matched related donors, pediatric recipients appear to be at significantly greater risk for infection than adult recipients (P < .001). Positive cultures were associated with evidence of invasion in 64% of cases (41 of 64). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that isolating adenovirus from more than 1 site correlated with greater risk for invasive infections (P = .002). Invasive infections were associated with poorer chance of survival.

AB - We report a 12% incidence of adenovirus infections among 532 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from January 1986 through March 1997. The median time from day of stem cell infusion to first positive culture was 41 days. Recipients of allogeneic stem cells, as opposed to autologous stem cell recipients, were more likely to have a culture positive for adenovirus (16% vs. 3%; P < .0001). Pediatric patients were also more likely than adults to have a positive culture (23% vs. 9%; P < .0001). Among stem cell recipients with partially matched related donors, pediatric recipients appear to be at significantly greater risk for infection than adult recipients (P < .001). Positive cultures were associated with evidence of invasion in 64% of cases (41 of 64). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that isolating adenovirus from more than 1 site correlated with greater risk for invasive infections (P = .002). Invasive infections were associated with poorer chance of survival.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033396237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033396237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/313514

DO - 10.1086/313514

M3 - Article

C2 - 10585802

AN - SCOPUS:0033396237

VL - 29

SP - 1494

EP - 1501

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 6

ER -