Adenosine slows the rate of K+-induced membrane depolarization in ventricular cardiomyocytes: Possible implication in hyperkalemic cardioplegia

Alexey E. Alekseev, Aleksandar Jovanović, Jóse R. López, Andre Terzic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperkalemic cardioplegic solutions produce cardiac arrest during open heart surgery by depolarizing the sarcolemma. A recognized adverse effect of hyperkalemic cardioplegia is the possible development of ventricular dysfunction believed to be related to intracellular Ca2+ loading, a consequence of K+-induced membrane depolarization. Adenosine has been proposed as an adjunct to hyperkalemic cardioplegic solutions. However, it is not known whether adenosine can affect K+-induced membrane depolarization, and associated intracellular Ca2+ loading. Perforated patch-clamp method, applied to isolated single guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, revealed that adenosine (1 mM) did not significantly reduce the magnitude of K+-induced membrane depolarization (35.7 ± 1.7 v 31.0 ± 1.1 mV in the absence v presence of adenosine). Yet, adenosine significantly slowed the rate of K+-induced membrane depolarization (167 ± 32.8 v 67.9 ± 12.9 mV/min in the absence v presence of adenosine) without directly affecting Ca2+, Na+, and K+ currents. Imposed ramp-pulses, with different rates (ranging from 0.33 to 0.05 V/s), but same magnitude of depolarization (100 mV), demonstrated that reduction in the rate of membrane depolarization decreases net inward Ca2+ current. Indeed, in Fluo-3 loaded ventricular myocytes, imaged by laser confocal microscopy, adenosine (1 mM) prevented K+-induced intracellular Ca2+ loading. The present findings indicate that adenosine slows the rate of K+-induced membrane depolarization, and reduces K+-induced intracellular Ca2+ loading in ventricular myocytes. Such findings support the notion that adenosine may play a cardioprotective role in hyperkalemic cardioplegia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1193-1202
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Induced Heart Arrest
Cardiac Myocytes
Adenosine
Membranes
Muscle Cells
Cardioplegic Solutions
Confocal Microscopy
Ventricular Dysfunction
Sarcolemma
Architectural Accessibility
Heart Arrest
Thoracic Surgery
Pulse
Guinea Pigs

Keywords

  • Adenosine
  • Ca
  • Cardiomyocyte
  • Cardioplegia
  • Depolarization
  • K

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Adenosine slows the rate of K+-induced membrane depolarization in ventricular cardiomyocytes : Possible implication in hyperkalemic cardioplegia. / Alekseev, Alexey E.; Jovanović, Aleksandar; López, Jóse R.; Terzic, Andre.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 28, No. 6, 06.1996, p. 1193-1202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alekseev, Alexey E. ; Jovanović, Aleksandar ; López, Jóse R. ; Terzic, Andre. / Adenosine slows the rate of K+-induced membrane depolarization in ventricular cardiomyocytes : Possible implication in hyperkalemic cardioplegia. In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 1193-1202.
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