Adenosine for wide-complex tachycardia: Efficacy and safety

Keith A. Marill, Sigrid Wolfram, Ian S. DeSouza, Daniel Nishijima, Darren Kay, Gary S. Setnik, Thomas O. Stair, Patrick T. Ellinor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether adenosine is useful and safe as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent for patients with undifferentiated wide QRS complex tachycardia. The etiology of sustained monomorphic wide QRS complex tachycardia is often uncertain acutely. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: Treatment associated with emergency visits at nine urban hospitals. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients treated with adenosine for regular wide QRS complex tachycardia between 1991 and 2006. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment with adenosine infusion. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Measured outcomes included rhythm response to adenosine, if any, and all adverse effects. A positive response was defined as an observed change in rhythm including temporary atrioventricular conduction block or tachycardia termination. A primary adverse event was defined as emergent electrical or medical therapy instituted in response to an adverse adenosine effect. A rhythm diagnosis was made in each case. The characteristics of adenosine administration as a test for a supraventricular as opposed to ventricular tachycardia were determined, and the adverse event rates were calculated. A total of 197 patients were included: 104 (90%) of 116 (95% confidence interval, 83%-95%) and two (2%) of 81 (95% confidence interval, 0.3%-9%) supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia patients demonstrated a response to adenosine, respectively. The odds of supraventricular tachycardia increased by a factor of 36 (95% confidence interval, 9-143) after a positive response to adenosine. The odds of ventricular tachycardia increased by a factor of 9 (95% confidence interval, 6-16) when there was no response to adenosine. The rate of primary adverse events for patients with supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia was 0 (0%) of 116 (95% confidence interval, 0%-3%) and 0 (0%) of 81 (95% confidence interval, 0%-4%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Adenosine is useful and safe as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent for patients with regular wide QRS complex tachycardia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2512-2518
Number of pages7
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Tachycardia
Adenosine
Safety
Confidence Intervals
Ventricular Tachycardia
Supraventricular Tachycardia
Proxy
Therapeutics
Atrioventricular Block
Urban Hospitals
Observational Studies
Emergencies
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Adenosine
  • Adverse effects
  • Anti-arrhythmia agents
  • Cardiovascular
  • Diagnostic techniques
  • Tachycardia, supraventricular
  • Tachycardia, ventricular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Marill, K. A., Wolfram, S., DeSouza, I. S., Nishijima, D., Kay, D., Setnik, G. S., ... Ellinor, P. T. (2009). Adenosine for wide-complex tachycardia: Efficacy and safety. Critical Care Medicine, 37(9), 2512-2518. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181a93661

Adenosine for wide-complex tachycardia : Efficacy and safety. / Marill, Keith A.; Wolfram, Sigrid; DeSouza, Ian S.; Nishijima, Daniel; Kay, Darren; Setnik, Gary S.; Stair, Thomas O.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 2512-2518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marill, KA, Wolfram, S, DeSouza, IS, Nishijima, D, Kay, D, Setnik, GS, Stair, TO & Ellinor, PT 2009, 'Adenosine for wide-complex tachycardia: Efficacy and safety', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 37, no. 9, pp. 2512-2518. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181a93661
Marill, Keith A. ; Wolfram, Sigrid ; DeSouza, Ian S. ; Nishijima, Daniel ; Kay, Darren ; Setnik, Gary S. ; Stair, Thomas O. ; Ellinor, Patrick T. / Adenosine for wide-complex tachycardia : Efficacy and safety. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 2512-2518.
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KW - Adverse effects

KW - Anti-arrhythmia agents

KW - Cardiovascular

KW - Diagnostic techniques

KW - Tachycardia, supraventricular

KW - Tachycardia, ventricular

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