Adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies: Interactive effects during CBT for social anxiety disorder

Amelia Aldao, Hooria Jazaieri, Philip R Goldin, James J. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

There has been a increasing interest in understanding emotion regulation deficits in social anxiety disorder (SAD; e.g., Hofmann, Sawyer, Fang, & Asnaani, 2012). However, much remains to be understood about the patterns of associations among regulation strategies in the repertoire. Doing so is important in light of the growing recognition that people's ability to flexibly implement strategies is associated with better mental health (e.g., Kashdan et al., 2014). Based on previous work (Aldao & Nolen-Hoeksema, 2012), we examined whether putatively adaptive and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies interacted with each other in the prediction of social anxiety symptoms in a sample of 71 participants undergoing CBT for SAD. We found that strategies interacted with each other and that this interaction was qualified by a three-way interaction with a contextual factor, namely treatment study phase. Consequently, these findings underscore the importance of modeling contextual factors when seeking to understand emotion regulation deficits in SAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-389
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptive regulation strategies
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Emotion regulation
  • Maladaptive regulation strategies
  • Social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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