Adaptation of lipid-induced satiation is not dependent on caloric density in rats

G. Paulino, N. Darcel, D. Tome, Helen E Raybould

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Food intake is modulated by ingestive (gastrointestinal) and post-ingestive signals; ingested fat is potent to produce short-term satiety (satiation) but this can be modified by long-term ingestion of a high fat diet. Aim: Determine whether altered lipid-induced satiation is dependent on the fat content of the diet, rather than increased caloric density or changes in adiposity. Methods: Initial experiments determined the differences in the microstructure of meal patterns in rats fed a high fat diet (HF: 38% fat kcal) and in rats pair-fed an isocaloric, isonitrogenous low fat diet (LF: 10% fat kcal) and changes in meal patterns measured after long-term maintenance on the HF diet. Results: Rats fed the HF diet had a significant 50% increase in meal frequency compared to rats fed the LF diet; in addition, there was a significant reduction in meal size (32%) and inter meal interval (38%) consistent with induction of satiation. After 8 weeks on the HF diet, these parameters tend to approach those of rats maintained on the LF diet. There was a significant 56% decrease in the activation of neurons in the NTS in response to intragastric gavage of lipid in rats maintained for 8 weeks on the HF compared to LF diet. Conclusion: Dietary fat alters meal patterns consistent with induction of a short-term satiety signal. This signal is attenuated with long-term exposure to dietary lipid, in the absence of ingestion of additional calories or changes in body weight. This adaptation of short-term satiety might contribute to diet-induced obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-936
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume93
Issue number4-5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 2008

Fingerprint

Satiation
Diet
Meals
Lipids
Fats
Eating
High Fat Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Body Weight Changes
Dietary Fats
Adiposity
Obesity
Neurons

Keywords

  • Diet adaptation
  • Food intake
  • High fat
  • Meal pattern analysis
  • Satiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Adaptation of lipid-induced satiation is not dependent on caloric density in rats. / Paulino, G.; Darcel, N.; Tome, D.; Raybould, Helen E.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 93, No. 4-5, 18.03.2008, p. 930-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paulino, G. ; Darcel, N. ; Tome, D. ; Raybould, Helen E. / Adaptation of lipid-induced satiation is not dependent on caloric density in rats. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2008 ; Vol. 93, No. 4-5. pp. 930-936.
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