Adaptation of an evidence-based intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening: A quasi-experimental study

Shin-Ping Tu, Alan Chun, Yutaka Yasui, Alan Kuniyuki, Mei Po Yip, Vicky Taylor, Roshan Bastani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: To accelerate the translation of research findings into practice for underserved populations, we investigated the adaptation of an evidence-based intervention (EBI), designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in one limited English-proficient (LEP) population (Chinese), for another LEP group (Vietnamese) with overlapping cultural and health beliefs.Methods: Guided by Diffusion of Innovations Theory, we adapted the EBI to achieve greater reach. Core elements of the adapted intervention included: small media (a DVD and pamphlet) translated into Vietnamese from Chinese; medical assistants distributing the small media instead of a health educator; and presentations on CRC screening to the medical assistants. A quasi-experimental study examined CRC screening adherence among eligible Vietnamese patients at the intervention and control clinics, before and after the 24-month intervention. The proportion of the adherence was assessed using generalized linear mixed models that account for clustering under primary care providers and also within-patient correlation between baseline and follow up.Results: Our study included two cross-sectional samples: 1,016 at baseline (604 in the intervention clinic and 412 in the control clinic) and 1,260 post-intervention (746 in the intervention and 514 in the control clinic), including appreciable overlaps between the two time points. Pre-post change in CRC screening over time, expressed as an odds ratio (OR) of CRC screening adherence by time, showed a marginally-significant greater increase in CRC screening adherence at the intervention clinic compared to the control clinic (the ratio of the two ORs = 1.42; 95% CI 0.95, 2.15). In the sample of patients who were non-adherent to CRC screening at baseline, compared to the control clinic, the intervention clinic had marginally-significant greater increase in FOBT (adjusted OR = 1.77; 95% CI 0.98, 3.18) and a statistically-significantly greater increase in CRC screening adherence (adjusted OR = 1.70; 95% CI 1.05, 2.75).Conclusions: Theoretically guided adaptations of EBIs may accelerate the translation of research into practice. Adaptation has the potential to mitigate health disparities for hard-to-reach populations in a timely manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number85
JournalImplementation Science
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Evidence-based intervention
  • Implementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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