Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI): Practice guidelines for management and care transitions in the emergency department and hospital

Charles V. Pollack, Alpesh Amin, William T. Ford, Richard Finley, Keith S. Kaye, Hien H Nguyen, Michael J. Rybak, David Talan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), formally referred to as complicated skin and soft tissue infections, include infections with resistance to previously effective antimicrobials. Increasing dramatically in incidence, they have become a challenging medical problem associated with high direct and indirect costs to both the medical system and society. Objectives: To describe the burden of ABSSSI and to explore multidisciplinary approaches to its management and new treatments that can be initiated in the emergency department. Discussion: We offer a best practice model aimed at providing risk-stratified and convenient care for ABSSSI at the lowest possible cost, while minimizing complications, readmissions, and inappropriate antibiotic use. In doing so, we focus on the care provided by emergency physicians and hospitalists and the transition of management between them for inpatient care, as well as the facilitation of observation or direct-to-outpatient care for suitable patients. Conclusions: A standard, consistent, and multidisciplinary approach to ABSSSI can streamline care, reduce admissions, support antimicrobial stewardship, and improve clinical and resource consumption outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-519
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Patient Transfer
Practice Management
Practice Guidelines
Hospital Emergency Service
Skin
Infection
Hospitalists
Costs and Cost Analysis
Soft Tissue Infections
Medical Societies
Emergency Medical Services
Ambulatory Care
Inpatients
Observation
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Physicians

Keywords

  • Absssi
  • Antibiotics
  • Best practice
  • Processes of care
  • Skin infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) : Practice guidelines for management and care transitions in the emergency department and hospital. / Pollack, Charles V.; Amin, Alpesh; Ford, William T.; Finley, Richard; Kaye, Keith S.; Nguyen, Hien H; Rybak, Michael J.; Talan, David.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 4, 2015, p. 508-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pollack, Charles V. ; Amin, Alpesh ; Ford, William T. ; Finley, Richard ; Kaye, Keith S. ; Nguyen, Hien H ; Rybak, Michael J. ; Talan, David. / Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) : Practice guidelines for management and care transitions in the emergency department and hospital. In: Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 508-519.
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