Acute and Midterm Outcomes of Antegrade vs Retrograde Crossing Strategies for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Chronic Total Occlusions

Damianos G. Kokkinidis, T. Raymond Foley, Ryan Cotter, Prio Hossain, Bejan Alvandi, Omar Jawaid, Moosa N. Haider, Gagan D. Singh, Stephen W. Waldo, John R Laird, Ehrin Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To examine whether an antegrade or retrograde crossing strategy for treatment of iliac artery chronic total occlusions (CTOs) is associated with differences in procedural or midterm outcomes. Materials and Methods: A dual-center retrospective cohort study was conducted in 168 patients (mean age 66.4±10.6 years; 116 men) treated for CTOs in 110 common iliac arteries (CIA), 52 external iliac arteries (EIA), and 26 combined CIA/EIAs. Logistic regression models were developed to determine the association between crossing strategy and procedural complications, 1- and 3-year target lesion revascularization (TLR), and major adverse limb events (MALE). Results are presented as the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: An initial antegrade strategy was more common for EIA CTOs (p<0.005), and an initial retrograde strategy was more often used in CIA (p<0.005) and combined CIA/EIA (p<0.005) CTOs. Crossover to an alternate approach was required in 27.6% of initial antegrade attempts and 9.6% of initial retrograde attempts. EIA CTOs were the most likely lesions to be treated successfully with the initial attempt (either strategy). In all, 123 (65.4%) lesions were successfully crossed with a final retrograde approach and 65 with a final antegrade approach. Overall target lesion success was high for both groups (95.1% vs 93.2%, p=0.456). Lesions treated with a final retrograde approach were shorter (75.3±34.9 vs 87.6±31.3 mm, p=0.005) and were more likely to be treated with a reentry device (34.2% vs 9.2%, p<0.001) and with balloon-expandable stents (39.2% vs 17.7%, p=0.005). The final antegrade approach was associated with a lower risk of target lesion complications (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.81, p=0.034). The two crossing approaches were associated with similar estimates of 1- and 3-year TLR and MALE. Conclusion: A final antegrade approach was associated with lower rates for complications but the 2 approaches were similar in terms of lesion success, TLR, and MALE. The EIA CTOs were more likely to be treated with an antegrade approach and more likely to be crossed successfully with the initial approach irrespective of the crossing direction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-349
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Endovascular Therapy
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Keywords

  • antegrade access
  • chronic total occlusion
  • common iliac artery
  • crossing strategy
  • external iliac artery
  • major adverse limb events
  • peripheral artery disease
  • retrograde access
  • target lesion revascularization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Acute and Midterm Outcomes of Antegrade vs Retrograde Crossing Strategies for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Chronic Total Occlusions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Kokkinidis, D. G., Foley, T. R., Cotter, R., Hossain, P., Alvandi, B., Jawaid, O., Haider, M. N., Singh, G. D., Waldo, S. W., Laird, J. R., & Armstrong, E. (2019). Acute and Midterm Outcomes of Antegrade vs Retrograde Crossing Strategies for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Chronic Total Occlusions. Journal of Endovascular Therapy, 26(3), 342-349. https://doi.org/10.1177/1526602819845679