Active surveillance for prostate cancer compared with immediate treatment: An economic analysis

Kirk A. Keegan, Marc Dall'Era, Blythe Durbin-Johnson, Christopher P Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The costs associated with a contemporary active surveillance strategy compared with immediate treatment for prostate cancer are not well characterized. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the health care costs of an active surveillance paradigm for prostate cancer. METHODS: A theoretical cohort of 120,000 men selecting active surveillance for prostate cancer was created. The number of men remaining on active surveillance and those exiting to each of 5 treatments over 5 years were simulated in a Markov model. Estimated total costs after 5 years of active surveillance with subsequent delayed treatment were compared with immediate treatment. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the effect of various surveillance strategies and attrition rates. Additional analyses to include 10 years of follow-up were performed. RESULTS: The average simulated cost of treatment for 120,000 men initiating active surveillance with 5 years of follow-up and subsequent delayed treatment resulted in per patient cost savings of $16,042 (95% confidence interval [CI], $16,039-$16,046) relative to initial curative treatment. This represents a $1.9 billion dollar savings to the cohort. The strict costs of active surveillance exceeded those of brachytherapy in the ninth year of follow-up. A yearly biopsy within the active surveillance cohort increased costs by 22%, compared with every other year biopsy. At 10 years of follow-up, active surveillance still resulted in a cost benefit; however, the savings were reduced by 38% to $9944 (95% CI, $9941-$9948) per patient relative to initial treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that active surveillance represents a considerable cost savings over immediate treatment for prostate cancer in a theoretical cohort after 5 and 10 years of follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3512-3518
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume118
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2012

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cost Savings
Therapeutics
Health Care Costs
Confidence Intervals
Biopsy
Brachytherapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis

Keywords

  • active surveillance
  • cost
  • economics
  • Markov model
  • prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Active surveillance for prostate cancer compared with immediate treatment : An economic analysis. / Keegan, Kirk A.; Dall'Era, Marc; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Evans, Christopher P.

In: Cancer, Vol. 118, No. 14, 15.07.2012, p. 3512-3518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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