Active smoking is associated with higher rates of incomplete wound healing after endovascular treatment of critical limb ischemia

Damianos G. Kokkinidis, Stefanos Giannopoulos, Moosa Haider, Timothy Jordan, Anita Sarkar, Gagan D. Singh, Eric A. Secemsky, Jay Giri, Joshua A. Beckman, Ehrin Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The association between active smoking and wound healing in critical limb ischemia (CLI) is unknown. Our objective was to examine in a retrospective cohort study whether active smoking is associated with higher incomplete wound healing rates in patients with CLI undergoing endovascular interventions. Smoking status was assessed at the time of the intervention, comparing active to no active smoking, and also during follow-up visits at 6 and 9 months. Cox regression analysis was conducted to compare the incomplete wound healing rates of the two groups during follow-up. A total of 264 patients (active smokers: n = 41) were included. Active smoking was associated with higher rates of incomplete wound healing in the 6-month univariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio (HR) for incomplete wound healing: 4.54; 95% CI: 1.41–14.28; p = 0.012). The 6-month Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimates for incomplete wound healing were 91.1% for the active smoking group versus 66% for the non-current smoking group. Active smoking was also associated with higher rates of incomplete wound healing in the 9-month univariable (HR for incomplete wound healing: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.11–4.76; p = 0.026) and multivariable analysis (HR for incomplete wound healing: 9.09; 95% CI: 1.06–100.0; p = 0.044). The 9-month KM estimates for incomplete wound healing were 75% in the active smoking group versus 54% in the non-active smoking group. In conclusion, active smoking status at the time of intervention in patients with CLI is associated with higher rates of incomplete wound healing during both 6- and 9-month follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVascular Medicine (United Kingdom)
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • amputation free survival
  • critical limb ischemia (CLI)
  • endovascular interventions
  • infrapopliteal disease
  • smoking
  • tobacco
  • wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Kokkinidis, D. G., Giannopoulos, S., Haider, M., Jordan, T., Sarkar, A., Singh, G. D., Secemsky, E. A., Giri, J., Beckman, J. A., & Armstrong, E. (Accepted/In press). Active smoking is associated with higher rates of incomplete wound healing after endovascular treatment of critical limb ischemia. Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom). https://doi.org/10.1177/1358863X20916526