Activation of bovine leukemia virus transcription in lymphocytes from infected sheep: Rapid transition through early to late gene expression

Maureen A. Powers, Kathryn Radke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) expression is mostly silent in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of infected animals. However, when infected cells are cultured, they are stimulated to produce virus. We studied viral transcription in PBMCs taken from BLV-infected sheep because the pattern of transcriptional activation in these cells should closely mimic activation of virus expression within mononuclear cells in vivo. BLV transcription was activated as early as 30 min after PBMCs were cultured. Expression was characterized by early and late stages, each distinguished by a unique pattern of cytoplasmic RNAs. In early expression, cytoplasmic viral RNA was exclusively the doubly spliced tax/rex transcript, although all transcripts were present in the nucleus. Early expression gave way rapidly to late expression, in which all viral transcripts accumulated in the cytoplasm. The polyclonal B-cell activator lipopolysaccharide increased the amount of viral RNA by at least twofold but did not alter the pattern of transcription. The transition from early to late expression required new protein synthesis and was blocked by the inhibitor cycloheximide. This requirement reflects the essential role of the viral Rex protein in the transition, but synthesis of cellular factors may be required as well. These results provide the first demonstration of staged viral expression in lymphocytes naturally infected by either BLV or the closely related human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) and validate the model of BLV and HTLV gene expression that previously was derived from transfection experiments performed mainly in nonlymphoid cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4769-4777
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume66
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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