Acoustic sequences in non-human animals: A tutorial review and prospectus

Arik Kershenbaum, Daniel T. Blumstein, Marie A. Roch, Çağlar Akçay, Gregory Backus, Mark A. Bee, Kirsten Bohn, Yan Cao, Gerald Carter, Cristiane Cäsar, Michael Coen, Stacy L. Deruiter, Laurance Doyle, Shimon Edelman, Ramon Ferrer-i-Cancho, Todd M. Freeberg, Ellen C. Garland, Morgan Gustison, Heidi E. Harley, Chloé HuetzMelissa Hughes, Julia Hyland Bruno, Amiyaal Ilany, Dezhe Z. Jin, Michael Johnson, Chenghui Ju, Jeremy Karnowski, Bernard Lohr, Marta B. Manser, Brenda Mccowan, Eduardo Mercado, Peter M. Narins, Alex Piel, Megan Rice, Roberta Salmi, Kazutoshi Sasahara, Laela Sayigh, Yu Shiu, Charles Taylor, Edgar E. Vallejo, Sara Waller, Veronica Zamora-Gutierrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal acoustic communication often takes the form of complex sequences, made up of multiple distinct acoustic units. Apart from the well-known example of birdsong, other animals such as insects, amphibians, and mammals (including bats, rodents, primates, and cetaceans) also generate complex acoustic sequences. Occasionally, such as with birdsong, the adaptive role of these sequences seems clear (e.g. mate attraction and territorial defence). More often however, researchers have only begun to characterise-let alone understand-the significance and meaning of acoustic sequences. Hypotheses abound, but there is little agreement as to how sequences should be defined and analysed. Our review aims to outline suitable methods for testing these hypotheses, and to describe the major limitations to our current and near-future knowledge on questions of acoustic sequences. This review and prospectus is the result of a collaborative effort between 43 scientists from the fields of animal behaviour, ecology and evolution, signal processing, machine learning, quantitative linguistics, and information theory, who gathered for a 2013 workshop entitled, 'Analysing vocal sequences in animals'. Our goal is to present not just a review of the state of the art, but to propose a methodological framework that summarises what we suggest are the best practices for research in this field, across taxa and across disciplines. We also provide a tutorial-style introduction to some of the most promising algorithmic approaches for analysing sequences. We divide our review into three sections: identifying the distinct units of an acoustic sequence, describing the different ways that information can be contained within a sequence, and analysing the structure of that sequence. Each of these sections is further subdivided to address the key questions and approaches in that area. We propose a uniform, systematic, and comprehensive approach to studying sequences, with the goal of clarifying research terms used in different fields, and facilitating collaboration and comparative studies. Allowing greater interdisciplinary collaboration will facilitate the investigation of many important questions in the evolution of communication and sociality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-52
Number of pages40
JournalBiological Reviews
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Acoustics
acoustics
Animals
animals
animal communication
Animal Communication
Information Theory
Animal Behavior
Mammals
artificial intelligence
Communication
Information theory
Amphibians
Ecology
Linguistics
Practice Guidelines
Research
animal behavior
Primates
Chiroptera

Keywords

  • Acoustic communication
  • Information
  • Information theory
  • Machine learning
  • Markov model
  • Meaning
  • Network analysis
  • Sequence analysis
  • Vocalisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kershenbaum, A., Blumstein, D. T., Roch, M. A., Akçay, Ç., Backus, G., Bee, M. A., ... Zamora-Gutierrez, V. (2016). Acoustic sequences in non-human animals: A tutorial review and prospectus. Biological Reviews, 91(1), 13-52. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12160

Acoustic sequences in non-human animals : A tutorial review and prospectus. / Kershenbaum, Arik; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Roch, Marie A.; Akçay, Çağlar; Backus, Gregory; Bee, Mark A.; Bohn, Kirsten; Cao, Yan; Carter, Gerald; Cäsar, Cristiane; Coen, Michael; Deruiter, Stacy L.; Doyle, Laurance; Edelman, Shimon; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Freeberg, Todd M.; Garland, Ellen C.; Gustison, Morgan; Harley, Heidi E.; Huetz, Chloé; Hughes, Melissa; Hyland Bruno, Julia; Ilany, Amiyaal; Jin, Dezhe Z.; Johnson, Michael; Ju, Chenghui; Karnowski, Jeremy; Lohr, Bernard; Manser, Marta B.; Mccowan, Brenda; Mercado, Eduardo; Narins, Peter M.; Piel, Alex; Rice, Megan; Salmi, Roberta; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Sayigh, Laela; Shiu, Yu; Taylor, Charles; Vallejo, Edgar E.; Waller, Sara; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica.

In: Biological Reviews, Vol. 91, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 13-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kershenbaum, A, Blumstein, DT, Roch, MA, Akçay, Ç, Backus, G, Bee, MA, Bohn, K, Cao, Y, Carter, G, Cäsar, C, Coen, M, Deruiter, SL, Doyle, L, Edelman, S, Ferrer-i-Cancho, R, Freeberg, TM, Garland, EC, Gustison, M, Harley, HE, Huetz, C, Hughes, M, Hyland Bruno, J, Ilany, A, Jin, DZ, Johnson, M, Ju, C, Karnowski, J, Lohr, B, Manser, MB, Mccowan, B, Mercado, E, Narins, PM, Piel, A, Rice, M, Salmi, R, Sasahara, K, Sayigh, L, Shiu, Y, Taylor, C, Vallejo, EE, Waller, S & Zamora-Gutierrez, V 2016, 'Acoustic sequences in non-human animals: A tutorial review and prospectus', Biological Reviews, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 13-52. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12160
Kershenbaum A, Blumstein DT, Roch MA, Akçay Ç, Backus G, Bee MA et al. Acoustic sequences in non-human animals: A tutorial review and prospectus. Biological Reviews. 2016 Feb 1;91(1):13-52. https://doi.org/10.1111/brv.12160
Kershenbaum, Arik ; Blumstein, Daniel T. ; Roch, Marie A. ; Akçay, Çağlar ; Backus, Gregory ; Bee, Mark A. ; Bohn, Kirsten ; Cao, Yan ; Carter, Gerald ; Cäsar, Cristiane ; Coen, Michael ; Deruiter, Stacy L. ; Doyle, Laurance ; Edelman, Shimon ; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon ; Freeberg, Todd M. ; Garland, Ellen C. ; Gustison, Morgan ; Harley, Heidi E. ; Huetz, Chloé ; Hughes, Melissa ; Hyland Bruno, Julia ; Ilany, Amiyaal ; Jin, Dezhe Z. ; Johnson, Michael ; Ju, Chenghui ; Karnowski, Jeremy ; Lohr, Bernard ; Manser, Marta B. ; Mccowan, Brenda ; Mercado, Eduardo ; Narins, Peter M. ; Piel, Alex ; Rice, Megan ; Salmi, Roberta ; Sasahara, Kazutoshi ; Sayigh, Laela ; Shiu, Yu ; Taylor, Charles ; Vallejo, Edgar E. ; Waller, Sara ; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica. / Acoustic sequences in non-human animals : A tutorial review and prospectus. In: Biological Reviews. 2016 ; Vol. 91, No. 1. pp. 13-52.
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