Acid-base balance affects dietary choice in cats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of acid-base status on self-selection of dietary protein was examined in three groups of adult male cats fed 20% soybean-protein and lactalbumin diets formulated to produce acidic, neutral or alkaline status. In two experiments, cats were offered a choice between the 20% protein diets or (1) the same diet with additional protein as casein (49% total crude protein) or (2) the same diet with added soybean-protein and lactalbumin (43% crude protein). Casein contained 0.63 mmol H+/g and caused all three groups to avoid the high casein diets by day 4. The high soybean-protein-lactalbumin diets did not contain added acid but would produce some extra acid upon catabolism of the sulfur-containing amino acids. Again, all three groups avoided the high protein diets by day 4. In a third choice trial, cats adapted to three low protein diets containing appropriate electrolytes to cause neutrality, acidemia or alkalemia, were offered a choice between: neutral vs. acidic; acidic vs. neutral or basic vs. acidic. The cats chose the neutral, neutral and basic diet respectively, restoring or maintaining acid-base homeostasis for each situation. The diets producing acidosis lowered serum sodium and potassium concentrations. We conclude that cats select appropriate diets in an attempt to maintain acid-base homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-192
Number of pages18
JournalAppetite
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Acid-Base Equilibrium
Cats
Diet
Lactalbumin
Soybean Proteins
Caseins
Acids
Proteins
Homeostasis
Sulfur Amino Acids
Protein-Restricted Diet
Dietary Proteins
Acidosis
Electrolytes
Potassium
Sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Acid-base balance affects dietary choice in cats. / Cook, Nancy E.; Rogers, Quinton; Morris, James.

In: Appetite, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.01.1996, p. 175-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cook, Nancy E. ; Rogers, Quinton ; Morris, James. / Acid-base balance affects dietary choice in cats. In: Appetite. 1996 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 175-192.
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