Acculturation level and caregiver outcomes from a randomized intervention trial to enhance caregivers' health: evidence from REACH II

Oanh Meyer, Xiaoyan Lucia Liu, Daniel J Tancredi, A. Susana Ramirez, Richard Schulz, W Ladson Hinton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Latinos comprise a growing segment of the caregiver population and vary widely in acculturation, yet little is known regarding how acculturation might affect caregiver stress or intervention outcomes. This study examined the relationship between acculturation and burden, bother, and depression in Latino dementia caregivers at baseline and following an intervention. Methods: This was a secondary data analysis of 211 Latino caregivers of older adults with dementia from Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) II, a multisite randomized trial of caregiver interventions. Baseline and follow-up data were used to run mixed-effects models examining the main and moderating effect of acculturation on caregiver stress. Results: No significant main effect of acculturation was found for any of the outcome measures, controlling for demographic covariates. Acculturation moderated the effect of the intervention on caregiver burden: those who were more acculturated benefited more from the intervention. Conclusion: Differential acculturation for Latino caregivers was not directly associated with caregiver burden, bother, or depression, but was associated with reducing burden from the intervention. Future research should explore by what mechanism acculturation influences caregiver burden following an intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAging and Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Health Resources
Caregivers
Health
Hispanic Americans
Dementia
Depression
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • burden
  • Caregiving
  • dementia
  • depression
  • Latino

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Acculturation level and caregiver outcomes from a randomized intervention trial to enhance caregivers' health : evidence from REACH II. / Meyer, Oanh; Liu, Xiaoyan Lucia; Tancredi, Daniel J; Ramirez, A. Susana; Schulz, Richard; Hinton, W Ladson.

In: Aging and Mental Health, 01.04.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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