Absence of respiratory inflammatory reaction of elemental sulfur using the California pesticide illness database and a mouse model

Kiyoung Lee, Jodi L. Smith, Jerold A Last

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elemental sulfur, a natural substance, is used as a fungicide. Elemental sulfur is the most heavily used agricultural chemical in California. In 2003, annual sulfur usage in California was about 34% of the total weight of pesticide active ingredient used in production agriculture. Even though sulfur is mostly used in dust form, the respiratory health effects of elemental sulfur are not well documented. The purpose of this paper is to address the possible respiratory effect of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and laboratory experiments with mice. We analyzed the California Pesticide Illness Database between 1991 and 2001. Among 127 reports of definite, probable, and possible illness involving sulfur, 21 cases (16%) were identified as respiratory related. A mouse model was used to examine whether there was an inflammatory or fibrotic response to elemental sulfur. Dust solutions were injected intratracheally into ovalbumin sensitized mice and lung damage was evaluated. Lung inflammatory response was analyzed via total lavage cell counts and differentials, and airway collagen content was analyzed histologically and biochemically. No significant differences from controls were seen in animals exposed to sulfur particles. The findings suggest that acute exposure of elemental sulfur itself may not cause an inflammatory reaction. However, further studies are needed to understand the possible health effects of chronic sulfur exposure and environmental weathering of sulfur dust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Agromedicine
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Sulfur
Pesticides
sulfur
pesticides
animal models
Databases
Dust
dust
lungs
Agrochemicals
Lung
acute exposure
Therapeutic Irrigation
ovalbumin
mice
Environmental Exposure
Ovalbumin
Health
agrochemicals
active ingredients

Keywords

  • Acute effect
  • Pesticide
  • Respiratory inflammation
  • Sulfur

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Absence of respiratory inflammatory reaction of elemental sulfur using the California pesticide illness database and a mouse model. / Lee, Kiyoung; Smith, Jodi L.; Last, Jerold A.

In: Journal of Agromedicine, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2005, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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