Abnormal conditions of the equine descending (small) colon: 102 cases (1979-1989).

A. J. Dart, J. R. Snyder, John Pascoe, Thomas B Farver, Larry D Galuppo

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57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The signalment, clinical and laboratory findings of surgical conditions, treatment, and outcome of 102 cases of descending colon disease in horses were reviewed. Abnormal conditions were categorized as enteroliths, impactions, strangulating lipomas, fecaliths, foreign body obstruction, volvulus, nephrosplenic entrapment, and other conditions. Eleven breed categories of horses were seen during this period. Arabians, ponies, and American miniature horses were more predisposed to descending colon disease than other breeds (P less than 0.05). Female horses and animals greater than 15 years old were more likely to be affected with descending colon disease, whereas horses less than 5 years old were less likely to be affected (P less than 0.05). More specifically, Arabians, Quarter Horses, and Thoroughbreds greater than 10 years old were breeds that were overrepresented when compared with the hospital population (P less than 0.05). Enteroliths were most commonly seen in horses between 5 and 10 years old (P less than 0.05) and were not seen in horses less than 2 years old. Enteroliths had a tendency to develop more commonly in Arabians and in female horses. Impactions affected horses greater than 15 years old (P less than 0.05) and had a greater tendency to affect ponies and American miniature horses. Female horses were more commonly affected by impaction than were males. Strangulating lipomas were commonly seen in horses greater than 15 years old (P less than 0.05) and more specifically female Quarter Horses (P less than 0.05). Fecaliths tended to be a disease of horses less than 1 year old or greater than 15 years old and affected males more commonly than females.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)971-978
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume200
Issue number7
StatePublished - Apr 1 1992

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Descending Colon
Horses
colon
horses
Horse Diseases
Arabian (horse breed)
horse diseases
lipoma
Quarter Horse
Lipoma
breeds
volvulus
Intestinal Volvulus
foreign bodies
intestinal obstruction
Foreign Bodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Abnormal conditions of the equine descending (small) colon : 102 cases (1979-1989). / Dart, A. J.; Snyder, J. R.; Pascoe, John; Farver, Thomas B; Galuppo, Larry D.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 200, No. 7, 01.04.1992, p. 971-978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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