Ability of a bacterial chromosome segment to invert is dictated by included material rather than flanking sequence

M. J. Mahan, J. R. Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Homologous recombination between sequences present in inverse order within the same chromosome can result in inversion formation. We have previously shown that inverse order sequences at some sites (permissive) recombine to generate the expected inversion; no inversions are found when the same inverse order sequences flank other (nonpermissive) regions of the chromosome. In hopes of defining how permissive and nonpermissive intervals are determined, we have constructed a strain that carries a large chromosomal inversion. Using this inversion mutant as the parent strain, we have determined the ''permissivity'' of a series of chromosomal sites for secondary inversions. For the set of intervals tested, permissivity seems to be dictated by the nature of the genetic material present within the chromosomal interval being tested rather than the flanking sequences or orientation of this material in the chromosome. Almost all permissive intervals include the origin or terminus of replication. We suggest that the rules for recovery of inversions reflect mechanistic restrictions on the occurrence of inversions rather than lethal consequences of the completed rearrangement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1021-1032
Number of pages12
JournalGenetics
Volume129
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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