A video game improves behavioral outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer

A randomized trial

Pamela M. Kato, Steve W. Cole, Andrew S. Bradlyn, Bradley H Pollock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

399 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Suboptimal adherence to self-administered medications is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video-game intervention for improving adherence and other behavioral outcomes for adolescents and young adults with malignancies including acute leukemia, lymphoma, and soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS. A randomized trial with baseline and 1- and 3-month assessments was conducted from 2004 to 2005 at 34 medical centers in the United States, Canada, and Australia. A total of 375 male and female patients who were 13 to 29 years old, had an initial or relapse diagnosis of a malignancy, and currently undergoing treatment and expected to continue treatment for at least 4 months from baseline assessment were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention was a video game that addressed issues of cancer treatment and care for teenagers and young adults. Outcome measures included adherence, self-efficacy, knowledge, control, stress, and quality of life. For patients who were prescribed prophylactic antibiotics, adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was tracked by electronic pill-monitoring devices (n = 200). Adherence to 6-mercaptopurine was assessed through serum metabolite assays (n = 54). RESULTS. Adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 6-mercaptopurine was greater in the intervention group. Self-efficacy and knowledge also increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention did not affect self-report measures of adherence, stress, control, or quality of life. CONCLUSIONS. The video-game intervention significantly improved treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge in adolescents and young adults who were undergoing cancer therapy. The findings support current efforts to develop effective video-game interventions for education and training in health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume122
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Video Games
Young Adult
Self Efficacy
6-Mercaptopurine
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Control Groups
Sarcoma
Self Report
Canada
Lymphoma
Leukemia
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Recurrence
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Adolescent
  • Cancer
  • Pediatric oncology
  • Randomized trial
  • Video game

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A video game improves behavioral outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer : A randomized trial. / Kato, Pamela M.; Cole, Steve W.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Pollock, Bradley H.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 122, No. 2, 08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b55995187d984443ba006f18c5df26a6,
title = "A video game improves behavioral outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer: A randomized trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. Suboptimal adherence to self-administered medications is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video-game intervention for improving adherence and other behavioral outcomes for adolescents and young adults with malignancies including acute leukemia, lymphoma, and soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS. A randomized trial with baseline and 1- and 3-month assessments was conducted from 2004 to 2005 at 34 medical centers in the United States, Canada, and Australia. A total of 375 male and female patients who were 13 to 29 years old, had an initial or relapse diagnosis of a malignancy, and currently undergoing treatment and expected to continue treatment for at least 4 months from baseline assessment were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention was a video game that addressed issues of cancer treatment and care for teenagers and young adults. Outcome measures included adherence, self-efficacy, knowledge, control, stress, and quality of life. For patients who were prescribed prophylactic antibiotics, adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was tracked by electronic pill-monitoring devices (n = 200). Adherence to 6-mercaptopurine was assessed through serum metabolite assays (n = 54). RESULTS. Adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 6-mercaptopurine was greater in the intervention group. Self-efficacy and knowledge also increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention did not affect self-report measures of adherence, stress, control, or quality of life. CONCLUSIONS. The video-game intervention significantly improved treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge in adolescents and young adults who were undergoing cancer therapy. The findings support current efforts to develop effective video-game interventions for education and training in health care.",
keywords = "Adherence, Adolescent, Cancer, Pediatric oncology, Randomized trial, Video game",
author = "Kato, {Pamela M.} and Cole, {Steve W.} and Bradlyn, {Andrew S.} and Pollock, {Bradley H}",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2007-3134",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A video game improves behavioral outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer

T2 - A randomized trial

AU - Kato, Pamela M.

AU - Cole, Steve W.

AU - Bradlyn, Andrew S.

AU - Pollock, Bradley H

PY - 2008/8

Y1 - 2008/8

N2 - OBJECTIVE. Suboptimal adherence to self-administered medications is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video-game intervention for improving adherence and other behavioral outcomes for adolescents and young adults with malignancies including acute leukemia, lymphoma, and soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS. A randomized trial with baseline and 1- and 3-month assessments was conducted from 2004 to 2005 at 34 medical centers in the United States, Canada, and Australia. A total of 375 male and female patients who were 13 to 29 years old, had an initial or relapse diagnosis of a malignancy, and currently undergoing treatment and expected to continue treatment for at least 4 months from baseline assessment were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention was a video game that addressed issues of cancer treatment and care for teenagers and young adults. Outcome measures included adherence, self-efficacy, knowledge, control, stress, and quality of life. For patients who were prescribed prophylactic antibiotics, adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was tracked by electronic pill-monitoring devices (n = 200). Adherence to 6-mercaptopurine was assessed through serum metabolite assays (n = 54). RESULTS. Adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 6-mercaptopurine was greater in the intervention group. Self-efficacy and knowledge also increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention did not affect self-report measures of adherence, stress, control, or quality of life. CONCLUSIONS. The video-game intervention significantly improved treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge in adolescents and young adults who were undergoing cancer therapy. The findings support current efforts to develop effective video-game interventions for education and training in health care.

AB - OBJECTIVE. Suboptimal adherence to self-administered medications is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a video-game intervention for improving adherence and other behavioral outcomes for adolescents and young adults with malignancies including acute leukemia, lymphoma, and soft-tissue sarcoma. METHODS. A randomized trial with baseline and 1- and 3-month assessments was conducted from 2004 to 2005 at 34 medical centers in the United States, Canada, and Australia. A total of 375 male and female patients who were 13 to 29 years old, had an initial or relapse diagnosis of a malignancy, and currently undergoing treatment and expected to continue treatment for at least 4 months from baseline assessment were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention was a video game that addressed issues of cancer treatment and care for teenagers and young adults. Outcome measures included adherence, self-efficacy, knowledge, control, stress, and quality of life. For patients who were prescribed prophylactic antibiotics, adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was tracked by electronic pill-monitoring devices (n = 200). Adherence to 6-mercaptopurine was assessed through serum metabolite assays (n = 54). RESULTS. Adherence to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 6-mercaptopurine was greater in the intervention group. Self-efficacy and knowledge also increased in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention did not affect self-report measures of adherence, stress, control, or quality of life. CONCLUSIONS. The video-game intervention significantly improved treatment adherence and indicators of cancer-related self-efficacy and knowledge in adolescents and young adults who were undergoing cancer therapy. The findings support current efforts to develop effective video-game interventions for education and training in health care.

KW - Adherence

KW - Adolescent

KW - Cancer

KW - Pediatric oncology

KW - Randomized trial

KW - Video game

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=49849084908&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=49849084908&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2007-3134

DO - 10.1542/peds.2007-3134

M3 - Article

VL - 122

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 2

ER -