A transnational study of migration and smoking behavior in the Mexican-origin population

Elisa Tong, Naomi Saito, Daniel J Tancredi, Guilherme Borges, Richard L Kravitz, W Ladson Hinton, Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, Maria Elena Medina-Mora, Joshua Breslau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We examined migration-related changes in smoking behavior in the transnational Mexican-origin population. Methods. We combined epidemiological surveys from Mexico (Mexican National Comorbidity Survey) and the United States (Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys). We compared 4 groups with increasing US contact with respect to smoking initiation, persistence, and daily cigarette consumption: Mexicans with no migrant in their family, Mexicans with a migrant in their family or previous migration experience, migrants, and US-born Mexican Americans. Results. Compared with Mexicans with a migrant in their family or previous migration experience, migrants were less likely to initiate smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38, 0.83) and less likely to be persistent smokers (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.26, 0.63). Among daily smokers, the US-born smoked more cigarettes per day than did Mexicans with a migrant in their family or previous migration experience for men (7.8 vs 6.5) and women (8.6 vs 4.3). Conclusions. Evidence suggests that smoking is suppressed among migrants relative to the broader transnational Mexican-origin population. The pattern of low daily cigarette consumption among US-born Mexican Americans, noted in previous research, represents an increase relative to smokers in Mexico.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2116-2122
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume102
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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