A third member of the synapsin gene family

Hung Teh Kao, Barbara Porton, Andrew J. Czernik, Jian Feng, Glenn C Yiu, Monika Häring, Fabio Benfenati, Paul Greengard

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Abstract

Synapsins are a family of neuron-specific synaptic vesicle-associated phosphoproteins that have been implicated in synaptogenesis and in the modulation of neurotransmitter release. In mammals, distinct genes for synapsins I and II have been identified, each of which gives rise to two alternatively spliced isoforms. We have now cloned and characterized a third member of the synapsin gene family, synapsin III, from human DNA. Synapsin III gives rise to at least one protein isoform, designated synapsin IIIa, in several mammalian species. Synapsin IIIa is associated with synaptic vesicles, and its expression appears to be neuron-specific. The primary structure of synapsin IIIa conforms to the domain model previously described for the synapsin family, with domains A, C, and E exhibiting the highest degree of conservation. Synapsin IIIa contains a novel domain, termed domain J, located between domains C and E. The similarities among synapsins I, II, and III in domain organization, neuron-specific expression, and subcellular localization suggest a possible role for synapsin III in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. The human synapsin III gene is located on chromosome 22q12-13, which has been identified as a possible schizophrenia susceptibility locus. On the basis of this localization and the well established neurobiological roles of the synapsins, synapsin III represents a candidate gene for schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4667-4672
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume95
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 14 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Synapsins
Genes
Synaptic Vesicles
Neurons
Neurotransmitter Agents
Schizophrenia
Protein Isoforms
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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A third member of the synapsin gene family. / Kao, Hung Teh; Porton, Barbara; Czernik, Andrew J.; Feng, Jian; Yiu, Glenn C; Häring, Monika; Benfenati, Fabio; Greengard, Paul.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 95, No. 8, 14.04.1998, p. 4667-4672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kao, HT, Porton, B, Czernik, AJ, Feng, J, Yiu, GC, Häring, M, Benfenati, F & Greengard, P 1998, 'A third member of the synapsin gene family', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 95, no. 8, pp. 4667-4672. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.95.8.4667
Kao, Hung Teh ; Porton, Barbara ; Czernik, Andrew J. ; Feng, Jian ; Yiu, Glenn C ; Häring, Monika ; Benfenati, Fabio ; Greengard, Paul. / A third member of the synapsin gene family. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1998 ; Vol. 95, No. 8. pp. 4667-4672.
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