A survey of physician attitudes and practices concerning cost-effectiveness in patient care

M. E. Ginsburg, Richard L Kravitz, W. A. Sandberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To identify physicians' views regarding cost-containment and cost-effectiveness and their attitudes and experience using cost-effectiveness in clinical decision making. Design: A close-ended 30-item written survey. Subjects: 1,000 randomly selected physicians whose practices currently encompass direct patient care and who work in the California counties of Sacramento, Yolo, Placer, Nevada, and El Dorado. Outcome measures: Physician attitudes about the role of cost and cost-effectiveness in treatment decisions, perceived barriers to cost-effective medical practice, and response of physicians and patients if there are conflicts about treatment that physicians consider either not indicated or not cost-effective. Results: Most physicians regard cost-effectiveness as an appropriate component of clinical decisions and think that only the treating physician and patient should decide what is cost-worthy. However, physicians are divided on whether they have a duty to offer medical interventions with remote chances of benefit regardless of cost, and they vary considerably in their interactions with patients when cost-effectiveness is an issue. Conclusion: Although physicians in the Sacramento region accept cost-effectiveness as important and appropriate in clinical practice, there is little uniformity in how cost-effectiveness decisions are implemented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-394
Number of pages5
JournalWestern Journal of Medicine
Volume173
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Patient Care
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cost Control
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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A survey of physician attitudes and practices concerning cost-effectiveness in patient care. / Ginsburg, M. E.; Kravitz, Richard L; Sandberg, W. A.

In: Western Journal of Medicine, Vol. 173, No. 6, 2000, p. 390-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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