A survey of host range genes in poxvirus genomes

Kirsten A. Bratke, Aoife McLysaght, Stefan Rothenburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poxviruses are widespread pathogens, which display extremely different host ranges. Whereas some poxviruses, including variola virus, display narrow host ranges, others such as cowpox viruses naturally infect a wide range of mammals. The molecular basis for differences in host range are poorly understood but apparently depend on the successful manipulation of the host antiviral response. Some poxvirus genes have been shown to confer host tropism in experimental settings and are thus called host range factors. Identified host range genes include vaccinia virus K1L, K3L, E3L, B5R, C7L and SPI-1, cowpox virus CP77/CHOhr, ectromelia virus p28 and 022, and myxoma virus T2, T4, T5, 11L, 13L, 062R and 063R. These genes encode for ankyrin repeat-containing proteins, tumor necrosis factor receptor II homologs, apoptosis inhibitor T4-related proteins, Bcl-2-related proteins, pyrin domain-containing proteins, cellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins), short complement-like repeats containing proteins, KilA-N/RING domain-containing proteins, as well as inhibitors of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR. We conducted a systematic survey for the presence of known host range genes and closely related family members in poxvirus genomes, classified them into subgroups based on their phylogenetic relationship and correlated their presence with the poxvirus phylogeny. Common themes in the evolution of poxvirus host range genes are lineage-specific duplications and multiple independent inactivation events. Our analyses yield new insights into the evolution of poxvirus host range genes. Implications of our findings for poxvirus host range and virulence are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-425
Number of pages20
JournalInfection, Genetics and Evolution
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poxviridae
Host Specificity
host range
genome
Genome
gene
virus
protein
Genes
genes
Cowpox virus
eIF-2 Kinase
inhibitor
proteins
Ectromelia virus
Proteins
Myxoma virus
Variola virus
Viral Tropism
Ankyrin Repeat

Keywords

  • Host range genes
  • Host-pathogen interactions
  • Poxvirus
  • Virus evolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A survey of host range genes in poxvirus genomes. / Bratke, Kirsten A.; McLysaght, Aoife; Rothenburg, Stefan.

In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, Vol. 14, No. 1, 03.2013, p. 406-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bratke, Kirsten A. ; McLysaght, Aoife ; Rothenburg, Stefan. / A survey of host range genes in poxvirus genomes. In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 406-425.
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