A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015

Brett Williams, Paria Mirmonsef, Charles A B Boucher, Frederic Bushman, Stacy Carrington-Lawrence, Ronald G. Collman, Satya Dandekar, Que Dang, Angela Malaspina, Roger Paredes, Arthur Stone, Alan Landay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of HIV infection has become the subject of intense research in recent years. A rapidly growing amount of data suggest that microbial dysbiosis - in the gut or the genital tract - can influence HIV transmission and/or disease progression; however, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved is lacking. To better understand the relationship between the microbiome and HIV infection, investigators from a wide variety of disciplines, including those working in basic and clinical HIV studies, cardiovascular disease, reproductive health, and bioinformatics, gathered at the first International Workshop on Microbiome in HIV Pathogenesis, Prevention and Treatment, at NIH on 7 and 8 April, 2015. Copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-941
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume32
Issue number10-11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Microbiota
HIV
Education
HIV Infections
Dysbiosis
Reproductive Health
Computational Biology
Disease Progression
Cardiovascular Diseases
Research Personnel
Research

Keywords

  • HIV
  • immune activation
  • microbial translocation
  • microbiome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Williams, B., Mirmonsef, P., Boucher, C. A. B., Bushman, F., Carrington-Lawrence, S., Collman, R. G., ... Landay, A. (2016). A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 32(10-11), 935-941. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2016.0034

A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015. / Williams, Brett; Mirmonsef, Paria; Boucher, Charles A B; Bushman, Frederic; Carrington-Lawrence, Stacy; Collman, Ronald G.; Dandekar, Satya; Dang, Que; Malaspina, Angela; Paredes, Roger; Stone, Arthur; Landay, Alan.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 32, No. 10-11, 01.11.2016, p. 935-941.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, B, Mirmonsef, P, Boucher, CAB, Bushman, F, Carrington-Lawrence, S, Collman, RG, Dandekar, S, Dang, Q, Malaspina, A, Paredes, R, Stone, A & Landay, A 2016, 'A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 32, no. 10-11, pp. 935-941. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2016.0034
Williams B, Mirmonsef P, Boucher CAB, Bushman F, Carrington-Lawrence S, Collman RG et al. A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2016 Nov 1;32(10-11):935-941. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2016.0034
Williams, Brett ; Mirmonsef, Paria ; Boucher, Charles A B ; Bushman, Frederic ; Carrington-Lawrence, Stacy ; Collman, Ronald G. ; Dandekar, Satya ; Dang, Que ; Malaspina, Angela ; Paredes, Roger ; Stone, Arthur ; Landay, Alan. / A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 10-11. pp. 935-941.
@article{0dfe8dbb99fa49cc9e7a45bb1ae51b9c,
title = "A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015",
abstract = "The role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of HIV infection has become the subject of intense research in recent years. A rapidly growing amount of data suggest that microbial dysbiosis - in the gut or the genital tract - can influence HIV transmission and/or disease progression; however, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved is lacking. To better understand the relationship between the microbiome and HIV infection, investigators from a wide variety of disciplines, including those working in basic and clinical HIV studies, cardiovascular disease, reproductive health, and bioinformatics, gathered at the first International Workshop on Microbiome in HIV Pathogenesis, Prevention and Treatment, at NIH on 7 and 8 April, 2015. Copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc 2016.",
keywords = "HIV, immune activation, microbial translocation, microbiome",
author = "Brett Williams and Paria Mirmonsef and Boucher, {Charles A B} and Frederic Bushman and Stacy Carrington-Lawrence and Collman, {Ronald G.} and Satya Dandekar and Que Dang and Angela Malaspina and Roger Paredes and Arthur Stone and Alan Landay",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/aid.2016.0034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "935--941",
journal = "AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses",
issn = "0889-2229",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "10-11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Summary of the First HIV Microbiome Workshop 2015

AU - Williams, Brett

AU - Mirmonsef, Paria

AU - Boucher, Charles A B

AU - Bushman, Frederic

AU - Carrington-Lawrence, Stacy

AU - Collman, Ronald G.

AU - Dandekar, Satya

AU - Dang, Que

AU - Malaspina, Angela

AU - Paredes, Roger

AU - Stone, Arthur

AU - Landay, Alan

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - The role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of HIV infection has become the subject of intense research in recent years. A rapidly growing amount of data suggest that microbial dysbiosis - in the gut or the genital tract - can influence HIV transmission and/or disease progression; however, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved is lacking. To better understand the relationship between the microbiome and HIV infection, investigators from a wide variety of disciplines, including those working in basic and clinical HIV studies, cardiovascular disease, reproductive health, and bioinformatics, gathered at the first International Workshop on Microbiome in HIV Pathogenesis, Prevention and Treatment, at NIH on 7 and 8 April, 2015. Copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc 2016.

AB - The role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of HIV infection has become the subject of intense research in recent years. A rapidly growing amount of data suggest that microbial dysbiosis - in the gut or the genital tract - can influence HIV transmission and/or disease progression; however, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved is lacking. To better understand the relationship between the microbiome and HIV infection, investigators from a wide variety of disciplines, including those working in basic and clinical HIV studies, cardiovascular disease, reproductive health, and bioinformatics, gathered at the first International Workshop on Microbiome in HIV Pathogenesis, Prevention and Treatment, at NIH on 7 and 8 April, 2015. Copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc 2016.

KW - HIV

KW - immune activation

KW - microbial translocation

KW - microbiome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991376283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991376283&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/aid.2016.0034

DO - 10.1089/aid.2016.0034

M3 - Article

C2 - 27267576

AN - SCOPUS:84991376283

VL - 32

SP - 935

EP - 941

JO - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

JF - AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses

SN - 0889-2229

IS - 10-11

ER -