A Study of a Cultural Competence and Humility Intervention for Third-Year Medical Students

Nayla M. Khoury, Joanna L. Suser, Lauren J. Germain, Kathryn Myers, Amy E.Caruso Brown, Francis G. Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluates the effectiveness of a cultural competence and humility intervention for third-year medical students by assessing changes in clinical evaluation assessments in patient encounters. Methods: This study examines the effect of a 1-h educational intervention on cultural competence and cultural humility for third-year medical students. Clinical assessments during observed patient encounters are compared in the clerkship before and after the intervention. The intervention adapts a previously studied cultural competence didactic and emphasizes cultural humility practices. Change in scores from the intervention cohort (clinical year 2019–2020) is compared to a pre-intervention cohort (2018–2019). Results: Students who completed the intervention demonstrate greater clinical competency in “relating to patients in a respectful, caring, empathetic manner” as assessed by supervising physicians compared with pre-intervention cohort students (2.7% difference in earning top two scores in subsequent clerkship, P value 0.05, Cramer’s V 0.04). Greater clinical competencies were also found in the intervention students compared with pre-intervention students in the domains “demonstrates accountability, contribution and commitment to patient care” and “develops insightful, focused, pertinent questions based on clinical scenarios” (3.8% difference in earning top two scores in subsequent clerkship, P value 0.01 and 5.1% difference, P-value 0.003 with Cramer’s V of 0.05 and 0.06, respectively). Conclusions: Educational interventions to improve cultural competence and cultural humility are important during clinical years to shape future physicians. Our study suggests that brief interventions may improve medical students’ clinical competencies. A future study with a more robust intervention is expected to yield more substantial results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Cultural competence
  • Cultural humility
  • Empathy
  • Medical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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